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Full text of "The Tower, 1931"







\ senator once voted for what bis constituents needed, — not for what they 
J. Hi- isn't ht the senate now. 



September 

9. W"c register today. 

Home Economics mixer. 

live hundred and eleven STUDENTS STRIKE up acquaintances, hopefully 

questing old notebooks. 

10. We're all in our places, some with and some without. Sign the card and get out. 

11. Y. W". C. A. Frosh reception picnic. 

The Sophs send their representatives out to take the annual Frosh ducking: Graf, 
Waniga, the Harmons. 

12. Church receptions. P'st! Which serves the most eats? 

16. Sophs tug to victory under the able supervision of Carl Roll. 

17. Last time Little Sisters give Big Sisters a party. 

18. First Stotttonia out. 

20. Bill Murray tangled up with a Yo Yo in practice 

23. Jean Homemaker arrives. 

24. Sophs MOVED into Lynwood. Bill Miller chewed the paint off the iron furniture. 
27. Physical exams for women. Someone thinks Charleston is Dr. Blom. 



Paz* One 













Convalescence i< //»<// state m which yon Income aware of your nurse's charms, — 
'/ any. 

29. Once again the Frosh. excepting I'.it O'Connor, knelt to pay homage to the 

"•>: inge". The belt brigade left a very smart impression. 
JO. Whiskers show Stout spirit. 



II. 
16. 



October 

wood Unharmi chestra meets for first practice with new song, "You're 

Drivin izy!" 

According t<> Mr. Price: "We believe in clubs for women, if kindness tails." 

College pictures taken. Crydcrman wore a hair-net to bed. — to keep in the wave. 
\\ . A. A. candy sale. 

Precedent established. H. Quilling the first woman editor of the Stoutonia. 
Home-coming plans brewing. Ready to uncork soon. 

I aurnte: "There was something I wanted to tell you, but I've forgotten what 
it was." 

Gail: "Was it good-night?" 

Another letter from Hcinie. warning us that Jocko is coming, to give the "wim- 
men a brake". On vour toes, boys! 

Decorations begin. "Work, for the night is coming!" 
Detroit sent representatives in paper boxes, 
["ons of Money" by the M. A. IW. 






/',.•„•,- 7 ■ 







A hick town is the place where nun who can't \<ay the grocer know )mt bow 
in Invest the union's htsuranct 



18. 

20. 



24. 
25. 

-"• 

2.8. 
29. 
JO. 



Pep assembly. Old cheerleaders < fficiace. 

Emma Newby: "A chicken, please.*' 

Carl Hoernamann: "Do you want a pullet?" 

Emma Newby: "NO, I want to carry it." 

Lyceum reservations. Nobody shaved that morn: 

I W .: "I'm in love with the most beautiful girl in the world." 

D. \I.: "And I like you too." 

Hyperian popcorn sale. Mr. Welch unable to attend classes. 

Mr. Ree production. 'Nu:T said. 

To the vacuum cleaner: The only sucker that was ever popular. 

Rushing season opens. Irosh women feast. 

Jurien Hoekstra sings in assembly. Myrtle Anderson (in front row): "And 

did vou see his teeth r" 



November 

1. The team journeys to Eau Claire. In the absence of the music, the band enter- 
tained with several deaf and dumb selections. 

2. Smallpox again present in the metropolis. 

4. M. W'ahl: "Lock how dirty those players are getting." 

Stori: "What do you think we have a scrub team : 
6. Farmers' convention. "No smoking in the halls." 






Page Three 
















// is still too carl) ti> tell u by half the Democrats mil be mad at their can- 
didate next sear. 



8. ¥c have been advised: "When you bring her home with the milkman, and 
papa is on the porch with artillery, be nonchalant — light OUT." 

\2. Carol McClurg: "Are those plus-fours?"' 

Bill Huntington: "They were before they were washed. They're minus sixes m 

14. Home Economics Club dance, "Bowery, Sidewalks of Paris.*' W'oodbutchers 
travel to lieloit. II. M. Hanson caught in the swinging doors of the Post OtHce. 

15. Stotitoitia reporter: "Docs hand-shaking pay?" 
Senior: "Well, it has kept me in school." 

17. Rusty reports that his church mice caddies are ready for work. 

18. Eloise Larson reports for tumbling in anticipation of the opening of the dancing 

class. 

19. Guelson dons the red flannels. 

20. Stout leads again. Talkies and radio are installed. 

21. Scz Nauta: "If Thanksgiving comes on Sunday, is Monday a holiday?" 

22. Dc Molay Formal. A good time was to be had. Did you have it? 
24. Prexy initiates new pool with stag party. 

27. Thanksgiving. "Sorry, but the rules — three percent cuts." 



Pat* Four 























































JUNIORS 






































Junior Class 



T11RII years have sped on their way, and what 
they have been, — marked by attainments not 
only in scholastic and athletic lines, but in campus 
activities as well. In striving to accomplish cur many 
freshman ambitions, we have given little thought to any- 
thing but carrying on the traditions and high ideals of 
Stout. If we were to recall the past a bit — well — space 
doesn't permit us that pleasure. 

One year remains during which we may add our 
contributions to the ever growing spirit of Stout. With 
the "will to do" wc promise that our contribution will 
not be a small one. 

We may look upon the class of '51 with envy, but 
deep down in our hearts we are eagerly awaiting the 
time when we shall hold that coveted position from 
which they are retiring. 



OFFICERS 



Keith Pi nn 

Harold Hyer 

Jam t Kyi i 

Elizabeth Curran 

Leon Haasi Treasurer 



Presidt v mester) 

President S d S w 

Vice-President 

Secretary 






fage Six 


















Gail Galloway 
I.ibcrtyville. 111. 
s. \1. A., Tower 



Cl ARI NCI C . Nl LSON 

Ogcma. V 



Km in kim (jrxmii 
Spring Valley. Wk. 

Philonuthean, V. A. A. 
Sketch Club 



(il K || I) G. Trmm k 

Fall Creek. \\ 
Band 



MaRCartt S. Simi 
Independence. Wi». 










W'n i ivm J. Mi< urn* 
Ru>k. W .. 

"Bud" 

Forum. S. T. S., Stoutonia, 
Hind, "S" Club. Tower 



Inn L A. Amu k«>n 
Cro*by, Minn. 

S. \!. V. Science Club, 
lower, Yiic-1'rcMdcnt Home 
I conomics Club, V. A. A. 



P. S»OYIR 

Hazdton, I'cnn. 

■sk,iz" 

Trca%urcr. DeMoUy 



II. Haksi n 
MenomooiCi H '■-■ 
llvperian. M. A. P. 
W*. A. A. 



1 1 ROM I S. H ANION' 

Taylor.VXiv 

"Hjik" 

Y. M. C A.. Metallurgy, 

Lutheran Students 






I' age 









Jon I'M A. Xi li>icki:r 
Albert Lea. Minn. 

'S" Club, Tumbling, Mar- 
quette-LaSalle 



Eldrid O. \\ iki 
Colfax. W.s. 

Arcmc, Hyperian, NX'. A. A.. 
Advisory Board 



RoBI Rl G. 

Aahland, w . 

"B>,n- 

Tower, S. T. S.. Y. M. C. A.. 
Forum 



Lorraine Litchi 

F.au Claire. 
"Raiin" 
Hyperian. Y. W. C. A. 



John E. Rude 
Menomonie, Via, 

"S ■ 
S. T. S.. Y. M. C. A.. Lu- 
theran Students. Football 




Flore no C. Vi rbrick 

Applcton, Via, 

"Vlott" 

President Home Economics 

Club, Marquette - LaSalle, 

rv Hvperians, 

\. P. 



Frld H. Do 
Whitewater, 

"Fr/7=" 
S. T. S., Lutheran Students 



G. Kym 
Menomonie. W is. 

S. M. A.. M. A. P. 



Jefferson I 
Menomonie. 

"Jeff" 
Metallurgy, "S" Club 



IOR PlERSON 
Menomonie, Wis, 

"Elly" 
S. M. A. 



Page 






Bbrnici G. Rricklr 

Park Falls, Wis. 

"Berbi," 

Arcmc, Pega»us. Girl's Glee 

Club 



Evi ri tt Smith 
Chetck. NX is. 

uty 

Treasurer Metallurgy! 
Tumbl 



Harr: 
Algoma, Wis. 



Ironwood. Mich. 
Marquette-LaSalle. "S" Club 



Clara C. WebEXBERGER 
Arcadia, Wis. 





W'll.I.IAM F. HoESER 

Durand, Wit. 
"B.. 
Tower, Tumbling 



Claryssi '■' 
Hendricks. Minn. 

Vice-President S. S. A., 

President Philomathcan, 

W. A. A.. Lutheran Stu- 

dents, Science Club 



Arthur G. DaVCHERTY 

Botcobdi n\ 
Track. Woodworker* 



Dork J. Hi NRY 

MTaukegan, III. 

M. A. 1'.. S, M. A.. Tower 



STAXLE1 G 
Brodhead. Wis. 
in" 

Metallurgy 



Page Sin* 















John I . lit ri NHOl I 
MuVtukec, Wk. 
"Booh" 
Secretary Metallurgy, Tow 



I i » :» G. P 
Mankato. Minn. 

Forum, "S" Club 



Anthony Rukar 

Gilbcr:, Minn. 
"Ton)" 



Edward R. RaOke 
Menomonie, WU, 



Arthur H. VC'ill 
Jt ff c no n, Wit, 

•■U',//;V 
Forum 




GlRTRLIl! H. Kl 

Hibbing. Minn. 

S, M. A. M. A. P., Lu- 
theran Students. Stoutonia 



ITRJLAN 

ni< . \V if, 

". 
s. \I. A., Secretary Junior 
Class. V. \\. C A.. Sec- 
retary i '.omics 

Club 



GlRAID R. I. ARSON 

LaCroi 



1 i : i v I . S 
Crystal Fall.. Minn. 
Inky Finder*. Science Club, 
Y. W. C A. 



Cam, J. Bunlrt 

Vi'aupun, Wi$. 

"Skipper" 

Vice - President DcMolay, 

\ uc-I'residcnt S. T. S., 

Forum, Stoutonia 






Page Ten 






Harold H. Ran: 
Stoughton, W '-.-. 



L Lixd 
MenomoniCa ^ is. 

Tower, Inky Fingen 



Makcki if Wahi 

Menumoni. . 



•> I . 1 : ; i» 
Houlton. Me. 



i VMON 
ElmwooJ. Wis. 













Marian' J. KtAKER 

Gilbert. Minn. 

"Frecklet" 

Glee Club. Marquctte-La- 

Sallc. Y. V. C \ 



Hi nry K iXGAS 
Biwabik. Minn. 

Y. M 



VTau<au, Vi,. 



I . HoBART 

Like I 
Philomathean 



Cl Ml n< i A. Vat.tr 

Tilde: 





















R H. Hcsko 
Biwibik, Minn. 

"Banjo 

Y. M. 



Hi i " n Cmamblrl.mx 
Mcnomonic. Wi*. 
S. M 



Tuomns J. Hooper 
Janovillc. Wit. 



Arthur H. Shudlick 

Rice lake, Wt$. 



Leonard J. Ni v 

Elk Mound. Wtt. 




Ajivra F. I 
Vwboro, 



GlOR( 

St. Cloud. Minn. 
S. T. S.. Managing Editor 
Stoutonii 



Dorothy M. Cole 

ClCl -JiV.J!!, ^ !». 



JCNNH A. I.ONCAR 

I rcleth, Minn. 



M. Vlnbirc 
F.vclcth, Minn. 



I'asc J 









Carl L. Roi :. 
Mayvillc. Wi». 

M. A. P., Stoutonia. Treas- 
urer S. S. A.. Forum 



Marion Cri« 

Ellsworth. Minn. 

M. A. P.. Vice-President 

Hvperians. Bind. Marqucttc- 

LaSalle 



Albirt 1 . ! : 
St. James. Minn. 

M. A. P.. Glee Club 



Rtm F. Li unr 
Pasadena, Calif. 



Birt W". ANDERSON 
Watertown, Wis. 
















(iR\lc i H. QUARTERS 

Superior. \\ 'is. 

Philomachean. Preiidcnt, 

Second Semester. Tower 



; V. LuiniGsoN 
1 Ik Mound. W 
. /" 
Tower. Y. M. C. A. 



Mvrtii Anderson 

Colfax. 

rt" 

. . M. A. P. 



Andrew O. Larson 
tonic, Wis. 



(il MVIIM DLTTON 

Menomonie. ^'i». 



• 









George Bimm 

VTausau. W'i>. 

"Dutch" 

Glee Club, Forum. "S" Club 



Irma E. Gilui rtson 
Black River Fall-. 

Hvperian, Girls' Glee Club, 

Orchestra, Y. v*-. C . V, 

Lutheran Student! 



AlllIRT O. ANDERSON* 

Mcnomonie. W is. 

"Squccki" 



W i m i v Hoc.rR 
Charles City, Iowa 

"W 



Catherine R. Ebner 

Virginia. Minn. 

Philomathcan 







Lvlra S. Andreassen 

Menomonic, Vk'is. 

S. M. A. 



Earl C. 1!>: 

S;. Paul, Minn. 

"Blue" 

Y. M. C. A.. Forum, Stou- 

tonia. Lutheran Students 



ISGA I 

Milwaukee, ^X'i%. 



Mil !>*! I' V. M\«.CARD 
AlliS, Wiv 

"MX 

Philomathcan. M. A. P. 
W . A A.. Science Club 



i. Kaddatz 
MaJ» ..n. Wis. 



Page Fourteen 















Florence a. Ryan 

Redone, Minn. 
S ' 



cam i . Murray 

Eau Claire. >X*i*. 

"B:ll" 

Stoutonia. s S lower, 

Mn Salic 



\. Adijj 
Vautoma, WU. 

. Band. Y. V. < . A 



I ; .i Ml r A. v. 
Milwaukee, Via, 
"A/" 
Diploma 19::. S. T. S., 
Forum, Editor of the Tow- 
er. Art* and Craft* Club. 
Stoutonia 



Evans 
O<hkoth. Wis. 




Harry G. RaNDBCRER 

Stoughton. Vi'i*. 



Valeria Vol p 

Menomonic. w*i|, 

S. M. A. 



Everett J. Kaiser 

Menomonic. 

Vicc-Preudcnt Band 



Menomonic. W is. 
"Djk" 
Band, Orch«tra. Y.M 

Sketch Club. 
Tower 



iter A. Larson 
Pewaukce. Wis. 

irv, Y. M. C. A. 
S. T. - 






. 


















La*ri n< i Chard 

Mcnomonic. 'S if. 

S. T. S. 



I 
Verona. V . 



Fri III Rl< K K. I M MLI 

VirOO.ua/w'it. 



LVCILLI Mil i k 
Dclavan, "Wis. 

S. M. A., Tower 



Balks 
Green lia\ . 




■ 
Motley, Minn. 
Forum, 



(in in Rr C.i HI i r 
Waterloo, w i. 



Joi J. Si'ir/N \<-: i 
Gilbert. Minn. 

v « lub. Marquetce-LaSalle 



Eileen Ross 
(. hicago, III. 



Arnold K: 
Eau Cltire, 

"Arm," 
Tumblers VC'oodworken 










FALL ATHLETICS 



















EAR1 BUR 151 IK, I 
Head Coach 

at ion 



The Coaches 



FABIAN SC HRANK 

I 






















Football— 1930 

FOOTBALL, in 1930, started with a squad of fifty-two 
men reporting. After a few strenuous weeks of practice, 
the squad was cut to thirty-three. Twenty-two men 
and two m inagers received letters, with seven men re- 
ing numerals. The season was net successful from the 
standpoint of wins and losses, but a good sixty minutes of 
football was guaranteed every Saturday. The team developed 
from green, raw material into a fighting squad well \ - 
in fundamentals. The bright spot of football is that eighteen 
of the lettermen will report next fall; the teams may also 
draw material from a few men who have transferred from 
other schools and from the incoming freshmen. \ 
season is looked for next year. 

Last fall, after a week's practice, the team went to Winona 
to play the Teachers, but the boys showed their inexperience. 
The following Saturday Macalester completely outplayed our 
team the first half — a fighting Stout team took the field the 
second half and played a great defensive game. Then came 
Stevens Point, our first conference game — a close game with 
hard breaks. After a misunderstanding had brought the 
«oldiers to Mcnomonie and had sent our team to Minneapolis, 
the two teams played at Fort Sncliing, in the dark, without 
the aid of lights. River Falls offered a fine game on a terrible 
day — breaks with the wind, a superior, experienced team; the 
Falls won in the last quarter. At Eau Claire our team did its 
best work — outgained and outfought Eau Claire but could not 
score. The final game against La Crosse was a thriller — a good 
defensive game — with mental lapses darkening the day for 
Stout. 

We hope the experience gained this year will benefit our 
team next year. Spitznaglc was elected backfield captain; 
Stori was elected line captain. 




Page S 









JOHX E. RUDE 

John more than fulfilled our expectations as a plucky 
wingman. The burden of captain fell upon his shoulders; 
he carried his responsibility well. When a forward pass 
appeared on the horizon. John had glue on his hands 
and Mercury's sandals on his feet. He leaves us this 
year. We lose the best when we lose him. 



JULIUS X. NELSON 

Sue possessed the ability of taking advantage of what 
holes he could find, and of making his own when there 
were none to be found. He has two more years of com- 
petition; we expect much of him. 



GEORGE BIWER 

Butch, although short-changed by nature, po^ 
the fight which made him the fly- wheel in the Blue an J 
White engine. He was a good blocker and a hard 
tackier. He is expected to bolster the line again nevr 

year. 



HENRY A. HARMON 

Harmon's sole purpose on the field was to play foot- 
ball. His playing was marked by intense spirit and fight 
as well as by unusual ability. His defensive work at 
fullback was always deserving of praise; he was a hard 
man to keep out of the play. 



LEROY E. MYRELL 

The experience which Myrell gained on this year's 
squad will be of value to him in his next two years of 
competition. When called upon to play, he proved 
steady and dependable. 











Pagt Tucnty 















HAROLD MATSON 

Mat son was one of the most consistent ground 
gainers in the Blue and White train. His running and 
stamina won him recognition as one of the mainstays 

of the backfield. 



GERALD E. DECKER 

Decker, a yearling, was one of the hardest tacklcrs 
on the team and rarely failed to get what he was after. 
He is fast and follows interference well. He blocks with 
the same gusto with which he cackles. 



DAVID D. BITTER 

Bitters held up the tackle position on the other side 
of Cronk. His playing showed real style when time 
and again he broke through the enemy's line to smear 
backfield men for losses. 



ANSEL L. ANDERSON 

Ans developed into a speedy end. His rangy build 
and speed increased the efficiency of the aerial attack. 
He has two years in which to secure more honors. 



GLENN JOHNSON 

"Tufty" gave .1 good account of himself at every 

turn. He was a dependable lineman, performing best 

on the defensive. He did much toward the team's pro- 
duction. 



T -.cent y one 






DAVID STOR1 

Playing a wing for the first time, Dave displayed 

a fine brand of football. His ability to spill interference 
and his fleet ncss of foot were deserving of special notice. 
His punting had both longitude and placement. He will 
captain the line next year. 



WILLIAM I. MICHEELS 

Overcoming the handicap of size. Bud gained more 
than a few yards for our side. His tackling in the 
open and his ability to squirm through small holes were 
features of his play. He matched brains against beet 
and won. Nothing need be said about his control of 
the skin when aerial attacks were the order of the day. 



JOE J. SPITZNAGLE 

It was Spitz's ability to shake off opposing tacklers 
which enabled him to get away with substantial gains 
in hard conflicts. He will captain the team next year. 
Show us the same, Spitz. 



JOHN P. HARMON 

Jack was an ideal man for cither guard or tackle 
position. He played a steady, progressive game that 
showed football genius in the rough. We'll watch him 
more closely next year. 



ANTHONY KUKAR 

Kukar was \ newcomer to the squad who developed 
into a real center. His services will be missed next tall. 



















ARTHUR I.. DEHLINGER 

Art started the season at tackle but was later shifted 
to end. One of the scrappiest players on the team, his 
specialty was Cackling pun; receivers just as they caught 
the ball. He will be back next year. 



JEFFERSON R. CRONK 

Jeff could always be depended upon to hold up his 
end on the defensive, and tear it down on the offensive. 
Stonewall Jackson had nothing on Cronk. There is a 
tackle berth waiting for him next year. 



LEWIS G. PA] MI R 

As a guard, Palmer deserves much credit. His Steady, 
progressive type of play was a great asset CO the team. 
His ability to run interference aided the team's offense. 
He has one more year of competition. 



THEODORE V. BIELECKT 

That practice makes perfect was proven bv Bielecki's 
handling of the pivot position. When he lent his sup- 
port to the line, that particular section had about as 
much give as a concrete wall. Well done. liielecki. 



JOSEPH A. NEUDECK1 R 

Joe was an important cog in the Blue and W 
scoring machine. His signal was the one to call when 
the opponent's goal line was within scoring distance- 
Joe's ability to leave the immediate vicinity at will 
marked him as one of the speediest halves in the con- 
ference. 













JOHN SLAUGHTER 
Manager 




NICHOLAS MARSILIO 

Assistant Manager 




Tuenly-four 
























ORGANIZATIONS 





















E 



The Stout Student Association 

VERY student, upon enrollment and payment of the 
student activity tee. automatically becomes a member 
of the Stout Student Association. 



The purposes of this organization are: to distribute 
the assigned portions paid into the association treasury to the 
activities incorporated, the Athletic Association. Lyceum Course. 
Stoutonia, Manual Arts Players, Band. Men's Glee Club. 
Women's Glee Club, and the Enharmonic Orchestra; to pr» 
one social event for each month of the school term; to take 
charge of Home-coming and partial charge of Commencement; 
to regulate activities of student organizations by maintaining 
both a weekly and a yearly calendar; and to act in the promotion 
of school spirit. 

The officers of the association act as representatives of the 
student body before the joint faculty-student committee, and 
all student voice and opinions arc transmitted to the officers 
of the administration through the officers of the S. S. A. 

The work of the S. S. A. this year consisted chiefly in 
aiding to perfect a more functionablc joint student-faculty 
committee, to re-organize the S. S. A. constitution, to open 
the Men's Club Rooms on a wider schedule, to agitate the 
spring election of the Tower staff, to place the Tower upon 
an assessment basis, and to secure greater student participation 
through student assemblies. 

OFFICERS 

Ernest Chris i ens Pn 

Clarysse Xi ss . . ... Vice-President 

Emma Newby Secretary 

Carl Roll Treasurer 














f". NtWBV 

5fC"fTAf»V 















The Stout Student Association 

Advisory Board 

j 

THE Stout Student Association Advisory Board is organ- 
ized to enact and enforce all regulations governing the 
student body, to further the interests of the students 
as members of The Stout Institute, and to make known their 
wishes to the administration. 

The board consists of two members elected from each 
class, one man and one woman representative, and the four 
S. S. A. officers. The S. S. A. president acts as president and 
the S. S. A. vice-president as vice-president of the board. The 
two members from each class arc elected the second week of 
school in the first semester and serve until Juno of the second 
semester. 

This board meets in conjunction with the Joint Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs to discuss or solve any problems 
which may arise during the course of the school year. 



MEMBERS 



Ernest Christensen 
Claris! Ness 
Emma N'i.wby 
Carl Roll 



SENIORS 

ARDLLLA ANDERSON 
WILLIAM SOUCIE 

SOPHOMORES 

ALICE LYNLM 
JOHN WANIGA 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



JUNIORS 

ELDRIl) VIM 
STEVE CVENGROS 

FRESHMEN 

RAMONA KI.ATT 
LAWRENCE HOYT 






Pace Twenty-eight 













r Ntwjyr. 




W Soocne- 




_/n pi ^ r 
Board 



C Poll 




R Kiatt L Hovt 






r,igt Ttt-enl y-niite 







The 1931 Tower Staff 

THE Staff of the 1931 Tower is grateful for the manner in which this publication 
has been accepted and supported by the school. The responsibility of publish- 
ing this year's book was assumed by the Junior Class. 
In producing this book we have desired to compile a written record of 
the interests and events of our past year at Stout. We sincerely appreciate every 
effort of others to aid us in the accomplishment of our objective, and it is our hope 
that we have not failed. 

NUMBERS OF THE STAFF 
E. A. Wolter EJitor-in-Cbicf 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
GAIL GALLOWAY JOHN BUTENHOFF 

BUSISESS MAS' ACER 
ROBERT REICK 



ADVERT ISIS C 



FLOYD LARSON. Adv. Mgr. 
FRODE ANDERSON 



F. F. WHITING 
HAROLD HYER 



ORGANIZATION 



I ANDERS 
WILLIAM MICI: 



LL'CILE MILER 



M UI.ETIC 



VILLI AM HOESER 



GRAYCE QUARTERS 



// iTVRl 



DORIS HI 



VILLI AM MURRAY 



ART 



GEORGl I.UDVIGSOX 
HLEEN IIND 



i. V. DOCKAR 
DANIEL GRE1 N 



PHOTOGRAPHER 
FRANK ( 






ADVISERS 

GERTRUDE L. (A! ! AHAN 



C. V. HAGUE 



Page Thirty 













J OUTCNMV"- 



umm 





W H> Ft Lajtso*4 r:fcNoe«KN f W. H 












Thirty-one 






The Stoutonia 

THE year 1930-31 marked one of the most prosperous and successful years of 
existence for The Stoutonia. Student enthusiasm and student labor have carried 
it along through the last nine months in fine shape, and it emerged a worthy 
member of the veteran college newspaper group. 

Primarily, The Stoutonia is the official voice of the school. Much space has neces- 
sarily been devoted to setting before the reading public the accomplishments and aims of 
the institution. On the other hand, the columns have always been thrown open to 
Student opinion, and the staff has made a special effort to secure each week the interest- 
ing items pertaining to student activities and desires. 

Various changes in staff personnel have been made throughout the year in order 
tli.it the best of the student writing talent should serve the Stoutonia readers. That 
this secured results has been evident in the rising standard of the paper. 

Putting management of the paper on a different basis at the beginning of the 
fall term has been in no little measure responsible for the success of the paper. As 
editor-in-chief, Miss 1 lenricttc Quilling served in conjunction with the managing editor, 
Mr. George Guy. Both editors had had experience which gave them a highly workable 
background for their duties. 

An editorial board was created composed of four associate editors who met weekly 
with the editor-in-chief and the managing editor to plan the paper for the coming 
week. In this way. the old element of chance and neglected assignments was eliminated. 
In addition, the paper took on a workmanlike and mechanically balanced appearance 
comparable to that of a metropolitan daily. 

The Stoutonia occupies the unique position of being one of the very few college 
papers in the United States both written and published by the students. The entire 
production, from the roughly drafted story, through the journey of linotyping, proof 
reading, headline writing, mechanical composition, and final printing, is the work 
of students. The Stoutonia in the past year has served five hundred students, a large 
number of local subscribers, and hundreds of alumni scattered throughout the United 
States and five foreign countries. 

George Guy Managing Editor 

Henrietti Quilling .... Editor-in-Chief 

Earl Halvi RSON Business Manager 

Floyd Larson .... Adi ertishtg Manager 

Frank Cassell. Associate Editor 

I '.km sr Christ! nsi n ... - Associate Editor 

Vivian Hiwiii Associate Editor 

James Dockar Editorial Hoard 

Jean Good Editorial Hoard 

Ami \ GUNDLOCK Editorial Hoard 

John Favili.e Faculty Adviser 

Alma May Ganz - - Faculty Adviser 

C. W. Hague Faculty Adx her 

STAFF MEMBERS 

GEORGIA ABER I. A. WOLTER 

WINIFRED PRIEBE WILLIAM MURRAY 

CARL ROLL WILLIAM MICHEELS 

CARL Bl IM R I II ONARO BROWE 

PAUL DOYLI (,| KTRUDE KELLMAN 

LAWRENCE CHARD CLIFFORD HANSON 



I'ngc Thirty-tin 







C: Cm*«t»-m3«-n C Halvprson W Pmcee- J Cooo L Orowe C Rot.*. 

mm® 

J. Oockar G A^em At VvtxTW A.Cuncxacm W. MiCMtro U Ckaho 




r LARSON W Murray g Kpllman C HANSON C Omnwt 



r«rr^ Thirty-three 















The Stout Typographical Society 

AS in the past, the Stout Typographical Society has functioned as one of the 
college's most prominent and worthwhile organizations. 

The club has had many interesting activities this year. Among these 
were initiations, smokers, and regular meetings, with short talks by faculty members, 
printing instructors, and students. Regular meetings were held every two weeks on 
Wednesday evenings at seven-thirty. 



First Semester 
Floyd Larson 
Cari. Beinert 

Wii ham Murray 

A I FRED Rl IN HOLD 



OFFICERS 

President 
Vice-President 

xsurer 
Club Reporter 
Sergeant at Arms 



Second Semester 

\\ ii i jam Murray 
Floyd Larson 

- Homer Proudlock 

- - La* iu n< i Lopp 

- Patrick O'Connor 



MEMBERS 



< ARI l;l INERT 
DAVID BITTERS 

i n\\ ARD . 

i I OX ARD BROVE'F. 
HERMAN BUROS 
BYRON CANA1 

< HAR1 Is CRYDERMAN 
CHAR] Is' 
LAWRENC (HARD 

FRED 
MARVIN 1 | 

iUY 
ROBERT ( 
ROI AND GRAF 
PHILIP HA 

\s HOOPER 
CARL HOERNAMANN 
HERBERT HAAS1 
CLIFFORD II . 
THOMAS JUN< 
FRANCIS JLT IN 



IN KNOTT 

FLOYD LARSON 
ROY LARS 
WII I IA.M MI( HEELS 
VII I IAM MURRAY 
NELSON 
PATRICK O'CONNOR 

R PROUDLOCK 
RICK PUR< l I I 
ROBERT REICK 
ALFRED REINHOLD 
! DVARD ROSENFELDT 
PAUL si I IOI NOFF 
FORRI 

JOE SPITZNAGLE 
HAROLD 1 
FRANCIS SUITING 

« INES 

WOLTER 
PETER ZIMMERMAN 






Past Thirr 










M 




"W 



6»M- 



WAIuHtfAv 

















Page Thirty six 











Mra H.C MiLnes 

— AovlWO — 



N. Marjiuio 

\AC» - PnilOTMI - - IWAIuOM - 




. 












HETEfeMrr f . 



rf ft*- 



Lynwood Hall 



UNTIL the summer of 1930, Lynwood Hall was used as a women's dormitory. 
In September of that year, it was remodeled, enlarged, partially refurnished, 
and opened as a men's dormitory. The Freshmen, a large number of Sopho- 
mores, and a tew upper classmen live at the hall. 

The organization within the hall is governed by the following: Henry Lewis. 
President: Arthur Dehlinger, Vice-President; Clarence W'auer, Secretary; John Hockel. 
Treasurer; and a resident preceptor acting as chief adviser. A committee of seven men 
c( -operate with the officers and preceptor in fixing all campus sentences and fines. 

A: the beginning of the secoi.. r Mr. Harold Hycr succeeded Mr. Fabian 

Schrank as resident preceptor of Lynwood Hall. 













Bertha Tainter Hall 

Bertha Tainter Hall houses about twenty students, most of whom are juniors 
and seniors, a few being sophomores. Its location on the shore of Lake Mcnomin 
makes the Hall a very delightful home for the girls. 

Mrs. Grace M. Dow Preceptress 

Vivian Hewitt House-President 

I'm i ENE Bonesho Vice-President 



MEMBERS 



GEORGIA ABF.R 
VIRGINIA BECHTOL 
PAULEN1 BONESHO 
MARY CARMODY 
JANET EVANS 
K Mill KIM (.RASL1E 
VELMA GUWASSER 
VIVIAN HEWITT 
LISLE HUSON 
GERTRUDE KELLMAN 



EDNA LANGSETH 
DOROTHY MADDI N 
CHARLOl \RTY 

EVELINE PETERSEN 
FLORENCE RYAN 
MARIE SCHROEDI-R 
LUCILLE SCHULTZ 
CAROL SIEBERNS 
LILLIAN SIEBERNS 
RUTH ZIMMERMAN 






Thirty-nine 
















C- Sv*dvw-Tw*5 



R Kr*.nzuscm-Aov. 




Page Forty 





The Stout "S" Club 



THE Stout "S" Club was organized to create a better school spirit, to boost 
athletics, and to award sweaters to every man earning his first letter in basket 
ball or football. The club has also arranged with the larger newspaper corpora- 
tions for reports on all football and basket ball games played, and for the publishing of 
other news of interest to the public. 



OFFICERS 



Henry Harmon 



President 
Secretary ; J Treasurer 



Page Forty-out 



^r 







Winter 

St a mi by my suit unci turn, J pray, 

On the lake below thy gentle eye%; 

The clouds bang over it, heavy and gray, 
And dark and silent the water lies; 

And out of the frozen mist the snow 

In wavering flakes begins to flow; 
Flake after flake 

They sink in the dark and silent lake. 

Yet look again, for the Houdi d'n ulc; 

A gleam of blue on the water lies; 
And far away on the dark hillside, 

A sunbeam falls from the opening skies; 
Rut the hurrying host that flew between 

The cloud and the water no more is seen; 

Flake after flake, 
At rest in the dark and silent lake. 

— William Cullen Bryant 




Page Forty-two 




A great and wise president h one who happens to be in office whew everyone is 
making money. 

28. Second Lyceum number, "Tales of Hofmann". New styles in men's clothing set. 



December 

L Nursery School Book and Toy exhibit. Bitters cuts classes to wheel the walk- 
ing duck. 

2. We think: The laziest man in the world is one who refuses to labor under a 
delusion. 

6. Tacky Drag. Wallin's minstrels star in "Sing, You Sinners". 

8. Count von Luckncr. Moral: Lighthouse keeping isn't all it's cracked up to be. 

9. Co-eds furnish model house. 

10. Miss Smith leaves us. We'll miss her. 

11. "S" Club sponsors "Half-Shot at Sunrise". 

12. Printers travel to Cities. At conclusion of game of hearts, Otto advises Mr. 
Hague to "get a horse". 

13. Reed (on a cold day): "Shucks, this weather isn't so hot." 

16. We believe it's all right for co-eds to know their onions, provided they don't eat 
them. 

ly. Hypcrians sponsor annual Berea exhibit. Japanese sale went over big. 




jgHj 



Page Forty-three 




One can always tell a tourist. He says the weather is rotten. The native says 
that it's 11 nits mil. 



18. Friend to Brandt's father: "What course is your son taking in college?" 
Brandt's father: "The downward course, I'm afraid." 

19. Round-trip ticket, please. 



January 

6. Classes resume. "Let's sec your diamond," 
Banjo Larson out of circulation. 

7. G. Kellman: "Yeah, he gave us an oral quiz and asked questions right and left." 
Carl Roll: "Why didn't you sit in the middle?" 

10, Catalogues are out. 

12. Professor Tustison: "Bielecki, you'd better grab hold of Miss Williams and start 
that experiment." 

15. Deep sea diver lectured in assembly. 

16. Soucie: "Do you like over-powering men?'* 
D. Henry: "1 never overpowered one." 

20. Bowling alleys open to girls. 

21. Band boys appeared in coats and caps. No girls appeared. 



Page Forly-fonr 




Educate your hands as uell as y&ur mind. This will enable you to cam a living 
in case the world doesn't appreciate your intellect. 



23. 
24. 
26. 

28. 
30. 



Firsc semester ends. River Falls, there. Gerry Anderson played a good game. 

The Mid-Winter Formal a great success. 

Walking papers issued. Other colleges benefit by increased enrollments. 

We register again. "Sure, I live in Wisconsin." 

Girls' Club Room opened with an all-school tea. 

Dorothy Joan comes to Homemakers. 



February 

1. Trader: "What did you get on your birthday?" 
Helen Novak: "A year older." 

3. Bonsall Smith writes from Turkey. 

4. A pun is a joke at which everyone groans because he didn't think of it first. 

5. They called him Daniel because he was such a Boone to the family. 

6. Joe: "I'd face death for you," 

Mary: "Then why did you run away from that dog?" 
Joe: "He wasn't dead." 
j. Visitor: "How big is your ice-skating rink?" 
Christy: "It seats three hundred." 
10. Her teeth chattered, but he couldn't hear what they said. 



Page Forly-five 




When a man breaks a date, he generally has to. When* a co-ed breaks a date, she 
generally has two. 



1 2. History tells us that William the Silent was married five times. No wonder he 

was silent. 
14. St. Valentine's Day. At last, Micheels found an appropriate valentine at 

Sniveley's. 

16. At S/outonia banquet, Christy: "How come the red nose, Carl?" 

Roll: "It's blushing with pride to think that it's keeping out of other people's 
business." 

17. "Kiss-a Me" presented. Hague and Dodson do their bit. 

Men's Glee Club and Band broadcast from WTAQ. Rosie remembered the music. 

20. River Falls here. We won, by golly, we won. 

21. Circus. Now we know Hank Harmon missed his calling. 
23. Grace: "Will you be at the cat show?" 

Lu: "Oh yes!" 

Grace: "I'll look out for your cage." 
2j. Stunt night. Large crowd sees splendid program. 



March 

2. Children's clothing exhibit proves interesting. 

3- Mrs. Filler renders a delightful violin recital at assembly. 

1931 

Pane Forty -six 






SOPHOMORES 















Sophomore Class 



B 



ECAUSE our school is what the classes make it, each 
class must do its work the best it can. It has been the 
aim of the Sophomore Class to do its part well. 



Among the duties of the Sophomore Class arc the 
instruction and general care of thj Freshmen. \\"c feel that 
we have been not only strong and competent teachers but 
that we have also set an example which they may well follow. 

We have contributed our share to the various activities of 
Stout, to the athletic, musical, literary, dramatic, and art 
organizations. 

The friendships and contacts that we have made and 
arc making in college are adding richness and pleasure to our 
lives. In this, our second year at Stout. w v > have strengthened 
old friendships and made new. Both our work and our play 
have brought us together in friendly groups. 

OFFICERS 

Oki n Stamstldt President 

Charlotte McNab Vice-President 

Jan it Robertson Sicntary 

Francis Griffith Treasurer 






Pate Forty-tigkt 













O. 3TAM3TAO C McNaB 



F. GRirf ITH J. Rj00CRT3ON 




H.Harmon A, Lynuw R. Grap L. Huson A.RnNHOuo M.Olson 




HStfen MMcMawon W Rowc- E-.Hanlcy I.Mrvw* F Rrrr« 




^^B^«fl 


1 fefl 




W MlLLff* M. HPNDMWON M-DODSON 5 HCNOftiCtOON V.Wk.L3TROM CHrRRMPYCR 




P RoSPNPCt-OT C Nauta J. Lockmart 



DovLf- G. Anocwon 






Pate f 







F. A.DCt> M TirTZ B.CAh*AT3rr R ZiMMCRKUN CTnARMON V V^UTWWSCK 



w --* * S 




1 




If 




M CaRMODY G PUNK 05TTOJN GA» f . R J«kKOUSCT, 




O. Bm*g J.Slauchtck C Nrwov J Harmon M.Knott C" Ungstth 




W- BRAMSMAW f PCTTf»CN J . FoCtLFf? A WP-5TN1AN R HOSSMAN M SchROCOCR 




L.LOPP W.ObA rVf«GIN M-BeCKTR c 



S' C HRONQ 
















M. SuMOS L SCMULTI C JOHNJON R MOHKAY O NUOOtN L.STFINBR1NC 




\ 









C Hg» o* i o c»on O 0<TTr«a G Rot- V VArtm R Ro^aurn O AuSman 




M Hf*LV J. MORKV A NrusON K MlLlPR V FLORIN rSCMROf«» 





23a 



M.rvrzPKTffiCK R TA.rrv H Mowr- f? How*ro P ^roman H Scmnasp- 



HI 




P 80NP3MO S WRIGMT V GuLTS9 






/"j/f / 






Vitai Lampada 



There's a breathless hush in the Close tonight — 

Ten to make and the match to win — 
A bumping pitch and a blinding light. 

An hour to play the last man in. 
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat, 

Or the selfish hope of a season's fame. 
But his captain's hand on his shoulder smote — 

"Play up! play up! and play the game!" 

The sand of the desert is sodden red — 

Red with the wreck of a square that broke — 
The gatling's jammed with the colonel dead. 

And the regiment blind with dust and smoke. 
The river of death has brimmed his banks. 

And England's far. and honor a name. 
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks: 

"Play up! play up! and play the game!" 

This is the word that year by year. 

While in her place the school is set. 
Every one of her sons must hear. 

And none that hears it dare forget. 
This they all with a joyful mind 

Bear through life like a torch in flame, 
And, falling, fling to the host behind — 

"Play up! play up! and play the game!" 

— Henry Newbolt 






Page I 



























WINTER SPORTS 




















Basketball— 1930-31 



BASKETBALL started with a large number of boys reporting, several of whom 
were members of the squad which finished so well last year. A total of fifteen 
games was played. Stout winning ten and losing five. In the conference, five 
were won, three lost; a total of 410 to the opponents' 331 was made, or 27.3 
points on offense and 22.1 points on defense. A well-rounded squad of twelve men 
carried the load of the season. A non-conference game with Hansen Furniture proved 
a little exciting for the first game. A visit to Carleton on its floor gave the team 
plenty of experience. A large floor and a seasoned team proved too much for the Blue 
Devils. The Menomonie Red Birds gave the shooters a chance to get their eye, and a 
\isit to Winona Teachers helped in our experience and also in the win column. The 
game before the holidays was with St. Mary's at Winona, when inability to make 
baskets beat us in a close game. 

Our first conference game opened the first week after the Christmas holidays 
with La Crosse at La Crosse. A bad first half with our team holding the champions 
to one basket; the second half was the outstanding performance. Score 24-22. Stevens 
Point came to Stout next and in a good exhibition was beaten 31-18. Eau Claire, 
with the poorest team in years, visited and was beaten 42-2 5. St. Mary's, a much 
improved team, proved an exciting and battling team in a 25-20 win for Stout. In 
our journey to River Falls, a surprise which defeated and completely stopped our 
offense awaited us. The result was a 30-19 defeat. La Crosse came next and was 
an almost exact duplicate of the first game, La Crosse making two baskets in the 
second half. The score at the half was Stout 6 — La Crosse I7. The score at the end 
of the game, Stout 21 — La Crosse 25. A remarkable second half recovery and excellent 
work by the reserves raised the score. 

Our journey to Eau Claire ended in exactly the same score as that of the previous 
game, 42-25. River balls came here and our boys were "hot" and "on" both in floor- 
work and in basketball shooting. A wonderful game was played to break the jinx which 
has so long dominated Stout teams and the final was Stout 33 — River Falls I7. Our 
journey to Stevens Point proved to be too long and tiresome; in a slow, listless game 
we emerged victorious, 23-20. 

The season ended, but a challenge and a plea for charity brought the suits out 
of the mothballs, and Elmwood. winner of the Professional Championship of this 
district, was engaged, with the result that charity was helped somewhat and Stout 
established the superiority of the amateur over the professional by a 31-18 score. 

The season was very successful, being the first one above 500'; in a number of 
seasons; not only that, all but two of the twelve lettcrmen return next fall to continue 
on our championship march which was started this year, ending with wins over Eau 
Claire, Stevens Point, and Elmwood. One of our men made the all conference team. 
Stori. Buros and "Kcrmie" Anderson made the second team, and Spitznagle was given 
honorable mention. 

Wc congratulate you on your season and look forward to a big year with a great 

team next year with everyone reporting. 



Page Fifty-four 










LEON HAASE 

Ott, the captain of this year's team, displayed unusual 
form. His spirit and fight kept the morale of the team 
on a razor edge. His ability to play either forward or 
guard positions made him a valuable assei to the team. 
He has one more year of competition. 



EDWIN A. IWHL 

Eddie's work in the pre-season games won him a for- 
ward berth. Although he was handicapped by size, his 
fight and ball handling ability made him a valuable player. 
His ability on defense proved a hoodoo to the opponent, 
especially in the River Falls game here. This fleet for- 
ward has two more years of competition. 



CARL H. HOI KM MANX 

Carl aided the team's defense. His work in the La 
game lineup proved him a stellar guard. Carl will 
be with us again next year. 



KERMIT E. ANDERSON 

Kenny, the boy from Ashland, was a most valuable 
center. His ability to get the ball off the backboard, 
combined with his clever shooting, many times saved 
the day for Stout. That Kermy was very seldom out- 
jumped at center greatly aided the Blue Devils' offense. 













AXEL JOHNSON 

Doc proved to be a capable ball handler and con- 
sistently did his bit toward the fine showing the team 
made this year. He always contributed to the score book 
when called into the play. His services will be missed 
next year. 



FRED H. JOHNSON 

Fritz, playing his usually consistent style of ball, was 
one of the main cogs in the Trainers' machine. His work 
in the La Crosse game here showed that he could always 
be depended upon. His best work was performed on 
the defense. He will be back with us again next year. 



DAVID STORI 

Dave, playing his first year, proved to be one of the 
most clever as well as one of the fastest men in the con- 
ference, winning for himself the position of all-con- 
ference guard. Because of his ability to dribble, he was 
the key man on offense. Much is expected of Dave next 
year. 



JOE J. SP1TZNAGLE 

Spitz had a combination of speed and floorwork that 
u.is hard to beat. His unerring eye for the loop greatly 
aided the team's victory at Stevens Point. Great things 
are expected of him next year. 






Pat* Fiftyii.r 









HERMAN* R. BUROS 

Lovey, co-partner of Dave, played consistent ball. He 
could always be depended upon. He was equally pro- 
ficient on both offensive and defensive. His best work 
was performed in the River Falls game. He will be back 
to aid the Blue Devils next year. 



GUST AVE E. CARLSON 

"Ah", the diminutive forward, played exceptional bail 
this year. He was fast and always in the play. He will 
be back to aid the team next year. 



STEVE A. CVENGROS 

Stikc, playing his third season of basketball for 
Stout, displayed unusual form on both the offense and 
defense. His work at center and forward was of a stellar 
type, particularly in the forward position. 



WSHL L. ANDERSON 

Ans, although not participating in much competition, 
proved that he will be a valuable man in the next two 
years. His rangy build makes him a good man for the 
pivot position. 









i'age / V 

















B 


m 


■ 


. 


1 


1 


■ I i -^ 1 " i 






P^J 


1 


F.%Um 


hr~] 


I r r * / * r 


1 


K 1/ <•' ft - 


Squad 


■ 





B Squad Basket Ball Team 

COACH SCHRANK'S basket ball B team came through this year in great style. 
winning all of their games. Several men have showed promise and will no 
doubt make a strong bid for the varsity positions next year. Early in the 
season the different men who came out for the team were divided into two 
squads, one the varsity, the other the B squad. Several men from last year reported, 
together with the new men, to make up a very formidable aggregation and to carry 
the colors of the Stout B squad to a 100 percent year. The B squad was given 
the different team plays so that they might work them against the varsity. This practice 
certainly helped both squads to know more about the playing of the different plays 
of the conference teams. In working under these plays and as a unit, the B 
squad gained much valuable experience, which will make the men good material for 
the wrsuy next year. 

Hylland. McNaughton, and Noble handled the forward positions in a formidable 
style, while Picrson, Decker, and Johnson handled the guard positions, with Steves 
playing center. Williams could be worked as center or as forward. Snyder also 
played fine ball. With many men of good caliber going to th« varsity, much may be 
expected of the latter team next year. 






I'agf I 





Swimming 



T 



HE swimming tank, remodeled during the past 
year at great expense, is now one of the best pools 
in the state. 



Interest in water sports has grown; the pool is in 
use during many hours of each day, being used for 
gymnasium classes, recreation periods. Red Cross life 
saving instruction, and competitive swimming events. In 
fact, the present interest in swimming is making it one 
of the college's most popular sports. 






• ■ • 








Home Towners 



Cafeteria. 



rrnest A l/k/f/er-Mgr 





frosh Home Towners 



INTRAMURAL 



Curtis House 




5P0RT5 



lis: . . 




Page 



















WOMEN'S 
ATHLETICS 







Women's Athletic Association 



DURING the past year, the women of the college have shown great interest 
in athletics. Through the Women's Athletic Association, through active 
participation in athletics and club work, they have been able to win the letter 
"S". Frances Incnfeldt, Henriette Quilling, Marietta DcCramer, Georgia Aber, 
and Josephine Edinger were awarded the letter last year. During the present 
year, Clarysse Ness, Alice Ostrum, Mildred Haggard, and Lois Lamon won the "S". 

The women who received the letter last year entered the competition for the 
miniature loving cups, which are the highest awards for excellence in women's athletics 
at Stout. The winners were Georgia Aber, Josephine Edinger, and Marietta DeCramer. 



ii®' 



rtyt:to 











Flashball 

AFTER many close contests between classes, the Seniors won the flashball title 
for the year 1931. The first game was between the Frosh and the Sophomores, 
the score being a 5 ill tie. The Seniors defeated the Freshman girls by the 
close score, 6-7. Again the Freshmen played the large score of 11-3. Then 
the Seniors defeated the Juniors 4-5, thus giving the Seniors the undisputed title for 
flashball. 



FRESHMAN TEAM 



M. BUBF.CK. Captain 
V. PR II Hi 
I . SIEBURNS 
I. AMIDON 



L. LEE 
R. KLATT 
M. DODDS 

\ Mcdonald 



SOPHOMORE TEAM 



J. LOCKHART. Captain 

L. HEBL 

E. SCHROEDER 

v. GUWASSI R 



\. NELSON 

l. PIT! RSON 
R. ROSSLER 
C. SIEBL'RN- 



JUNIOR TEAM 

M. HAGGARD. Captain 

C. NESS 

G. QUARTERS 

A. OSTRLM 



L. HOI BART 
E. ANDERSON 

L. LAMON 



SENIOR TEAM 



J. EDING1 R. Captain 
M. DcCRAMER 
I. INENFELDT 




H. QUILLING 

G. ABER 

E. BORCHERT 




threr 




Basket Ball 

THE Sophomore team won the title for the interclass championship in basket ball. 
This is the second year that this team has been victorious. The first game was 
played between the Freshmen and the Sophomores, the latter winning by an 
overwhelming score of 9 — 53. The Junior team easily defeated the Seniors ly — 7. 
The Frosh were victorious when they played against the Seniors, the score being very 
close, 14-15. The Juniors forfeited their chance to be victors to the Sophomores, 
thereby making the class of 1954 the interclass champions. 

There were several girls who did outstanding work in basketball this year. The 
high point scorers were: C. Xess, with 36 points; L. Hebl. with 54 points; and I. 
Nienow, with 26 points. 

Members of the various teams were: 



I. AMIDON, Captain 
M. ROTTIXGER 
H. Ml LGES 
M. BUBECK 

L. HEBL. Captain 
V. GUTVTASSER 
I. NIENOW 
I. MOE 
M. J. DODSON 

E. ANDERSON, Captain 
C. NESS 

A. OSTRUM 
M. HAGGARD 

G. ABER. Captain 
H. QUILLING 

F. INENFELDT 
F. HILL 



IRISHMAN 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



a. m.donald 
m. dodds 

R. KI ATT 
C. SIEBLRNS 

J. ROBERTSON 
I. FOELLER 
J. LOCKHART 
R. HO»- 



G. QUARTERS 

L. LAMON 

M. ANDERSON 



M. DeCRAMER 
M. HRYZ 
J. EDINGER 



tyfoiu 




Swimming 

IN the most successful swimming meet ever held at Stout, the Junior class came out 
on top with the Senior class taking second place. The captain of the Junior i;roup, 

Janet Evans, won the individual honors. 

The relay between classes offered excellent entertainment. The Junior team, made 
up of Janet Evans, Catherine Ebner. Katherine Graslie. and Graycc Quarters, won first 
place by several yards. 

In diving, Graycc Quarters won first place, Janet Evans second. 

The underwater swim was won by a Sophomore, Carol Sicburns, who swam ninety- 
seven feet. Graycc Quarters, swimming ninety-three feet, won second place. 

The honors for strokes went to Catherine Ebner of the Junior class; Frances 
Inenfeldt. a Senior, won second honors; Laura Andreassen third. 



I-RESHMI N 
1. Ml KIRNS, Captain B. VALRATH C. MORRIS 

S«/» 

J. TODD V. HARMS P. GRAY 

SOPHOMORES 
V. GLTVASSER, CaptainC. SIEBURNS M. DODSON 

Subs 
INGSETH L. SCHULTZ R. ZIMMERMAN 



I. 1 VANS. Captain 
A. OSTRL'M 

G. AM R. Captain 



JUNIORS 

\I R K. GRASUE 

Subs 
M. GULESSERIAN i AGGARD 

SENIORS 

! I\l Ml IDT I. ANDKKASSEN 



I. AMIDON 
N. NICKEL 

D. MADDEN 

I. MOE 

G. QUARTERS 



H. QUII I INC 





Page .s i ■ 
















The Stout Tumblers 

THE Stout Tumblers, organized as a class under the direction of Professor P. C. 
.Nelson and Miss li.iierud, have been very active during the past season, having 
given several exhibitions before the students, the townspeople, and friends at 
Elm wood. 



NUMBERS 



ROMONA K! ATT 
ELOISE LARSON 
CAROLINE BRICK 
EVELYN BORCHERT 

MARY GREEN 
REUBEN HANSEN 
I VI R I IT SMITH 
WILLIAM HOESER 



MERLIN I KERN 

ARNOLD KHUN 

RODERICK PURC1 I I 

DONA] I) Vii I LAMS 
HOMER ROSE 
CARL ROLL 
JOSEPH NEUDECKl R 
CLARENCE VTAUER 



VII NAM MURRAY 

































ORGANIZATIONS 












Ko 






The Manual Arts Players 



OUR aim is to maintain a high standard of dramatics in our college. We are 
a group of college students, who have a common interest, and, as loyal members 
of our club, we must co-operate and perform faithfully any duties given to 
us in order that we may attain the standards we have set for ourselves. In order 
to be elected to membership in the Manual Arts Players, a student must have 
evidenced ability in dramatics and have shown a willingness to do good work in 
whatever he has attempted. 



OFFICERS 



Miss Violet M. Hassler 
Russell W'aiiin 
Carol McCllrc - 
Francis Schroeder 
Bern-hard Hagen 

Miss Ma.MII MlTZ - 

Mr. W. B. Davison - 



Director 

President 

- \ite-PresiJent 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

Honorary Member 
Honorary Member 



MI.MBI RS 



MYR II 1 ANDERSON 
ERNEST CHRISTENMN 
ALICE COCKERI! I 
MARION CRESS 
MARY JANE DODSON 
1WI FOELLER 
II AN GOOD 
PHYLLIS GRAY 
MARY GULLESSARIAN 
Bl RM1AR1) ll\ 
MILDRI I) HAGGARD 
A I BERT HANSON 
! MM A HANSON 
HI NRY HARM 
ALICE HASELRUD 
DORIS HENRY 
EVELYN HUNT 
w II HAM HUNTINGTON 
ROBERT JAKOUBEK 
t.IRTRUDE KELLMAN 



JANET KYLE 
JUNE LOCKHART 
CAROL MeCLURG 
KARL MILLER 
! KM ST MU1 II R 
EMMA NEVBY 
PATRICK OCONNER 
FRANCIS SCHROEDER 
HAROLD STROZINSKY 
CARL ROLL 
FLORENCE VF.RBRICK 
RUSSELL Vi'Al I IN 
VERNA THOMPSON- 
HI NRY LINK 
FRANK CASSEL 
THEODORE PIERSON 
JACK HARMON 
1 VI I VINES 
EVERIS NELSON 
I AwTtENCE HOYT 






ISnELJ 



**»"• K«MW« 




• IT..-. 



(T)nmial Sxfe 'Planers 






/'atft- Sixty-nine 
















"Quality Street" 

Presented by the Manual Arts Players 

May 2. 1950 



THE play, "Quality Street", portrays life in England at the time of the Napoleonic 
W us. and the cast was costumed in accordance with the period. The play 
was a charming fantasy and the period costumes presented a delightfully color- 
ful and picturesque attraction. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Phoebe Thrassel, a delightfully quaint and lovely maiden Mary Jane Dodsen 

Mary W'illoughby Alice Hazclrud 

Susan Thrassel Jane Eocllcr 

Fanny W'illoughby Janet Kyle 

Henrietta Turnbull Florence Verbrick 

Edith Emma Newbj 

Isabella Doris Henry 

Miss Beverage Mildred Haggard 

Arthur W'ellesley Thomson Carl Roll 

Georgic George Bryant 

William Smith John Waniga 

Eusign blades Nathanial Ward 

Recruiting Sargent George Price 

Spicer Karl Miller 

An Old Soldier Ralph Shoude 

Harriet Emma I lanson 

Charlotte Parrott Carol McClurg 

Patty Alice Cockerill 

\ .dentine Brown Albert Hanson 





"Tons of Money" 

Presented by the Manual Arts PL 
October I7, 1930 

IN "Tons of Money", a character farce by Will Evans and Valentine, the audience 
looks into a certain type of English home. Aubrey AllingCOn, the head of the 
family, is a very sensitive and financially embarrassed Englishman. A large fortune 
left to certain heirs is the basis of the plot. 

Louise Allington, Aubrey's wife, keeps the plot active by making her husband 
ridiculous. In the end he is no better off than at the start, the inheritance being one 
pound, four shillings, and a half penny. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Spruies (a butler) 
Simpson (a parlor maid) 
Miss Bcnita Mullctt 
Louise Allington 

Aubrey Henry Maitland Allington ... 
Giles (a gardener) 
James Chesterman (a solicitor) 
Jean Everard 

George Maitland 



Ernest Muller 

Myrtle Anderson 

Jane Foeller 

Emma N'ewby 

Russell Wallin 

Carl Roll 

Bcrnhard Hagen 

Gertrude Kellman 

Robert Jakoubek 

William Huntington 




Page Sevenl 










-.c*»- 







V. Volp - 

Tm»'»uw r» 






Page S 




l'<t£C Se-.mly four 




m. Mmm 

"» ov. — 







[ m 









:y-f.:e 




Hyperian Society 

THE Hyperian Society is one of the three social organizations for the girls of 
The Stout Institute. The club has a threefold purpose of promoting social 
life among its members, of supporting school activities and school interests, and 
of doing active social work in the community. 

Before Christmas, the Hypcrians gav< a party for some of the poor children of 

the city. During the months of March. April, and May the society conducted a 

children's story hour on Saturday mornings. The society also provides a few necessities 
child in whom it is interested. 



Pate 



oe 











O Stamst/^o 



Pa/f<- Seventy-eight 








Page Sixty-nitu 




13 



c. A>oeR 




C. CXn-ToN 



Miss L Buchanan 
— Fxc Aov — 




A, Aoe-3 
-Snc- 





V. HfrWtTT 



m 











Eighty 







Men's Glee Club 

THE Men's Glee Club consists of members chosen at the beginning of each 
year by competitive try-outs. 

Our aim is to develop musical talent as well as poise and ease through 
public appearance. Both the classical and lighter types of glee club work are Stressed. 

The club gave concerts in some of our neighboring cities. Of particular interest 
were the concerts which were broadcast over radio station W. T. A. Q., Eau Claire, 
nsin. 

OFFICERS 

Own 1'. Stamstad President 

>rge Btver Vice-President 

Kari J. Mm i ik .... Secretary tf Treasurer 
Mr. Good Director 

MRS. Mrr< HEL1 Accompanist 

MEMBERS 
First Tenor First IJ.tss 

LEON HAAS! ORIN P 

WILLIAM I. ROW! Von^'i 'h^riur 

CHA HARMON RO^T M ^MBERLIN 

ROIURr GUNN FRANK A. < Ass! ! 

Second Tenor >nd Bass 

BEN ! . HAG! \ l EON \KI> A. BROW] 

HI I MITH II. BRAMSTEDT \! Hi RT L HANS 

JAMES C BERNDT SCOTT M. DAVIS* 

:i |. MILLER LAWRENCE B. HOYT 



I :. 







Stout Band 

THE Stout Band was organized in 1922. All students who play instruments and 
arc interested in fostering music at Stout are eligible. Rehearsals are held 
regularly every Tuesday evening. 

From time to time the band furnishes music for the football and basketball games 
and for the various student activities in and out of assembly. In the spring several out- 
door concerts are given for the people of Menomonie. 

OFFICERS 

DONALD MOLDENHAUER President 

\ vi Ri ii KAISER Vice-President 

Edward Rosenfeldt ... Secretary-Treasurer 

Edward Rosenfeldt Librarian 

J. E. Ray ------- Faculty AJi iter 

( HARLES [NGRAHAM ------ Director 

MEMBERS 

DONALD MOLDENHAUER LAWRENCE HOYT 

GERHARD [OHNSON LAWRENC1 KUNZ 

ALVA ADES EVERETT PAULSON 

wlLLIAM HUNTINGTON OSWALD BERG 

GERALD TRADER EDWARD ROSENFELDT 

LORRAIM sTMNBRING EVELYN ADES 

< I IFFORD TW1 I I) FRODI AND! RSON 

FRANK M\N\ KARL MILLER 

MILDRED NICKII GEORGE HERRMLYLR 

MARIORINDA os<,OOD GEORGE SOUTHERN 

DWIGHT NK.HOLS LOIS LAMON 

DONALD I IND LEONARD BROW] 

FRANCIS GRIF""ETH ROBERT fENSON 

\I I ARD ROW! ( I! \Ri ES HARMON 

EVERETT KAISER HENRY HOW I 

I. I . RAY DANIl I GR1 I N 

AUGUST SCHLUMPF BYRM BEC.UHN 

ARTHUR SCHEETNER WILLIAM MICH EELS 



Page 










T 



Stout Orchestra 

HE Stout Orchestra was organized in the autumn of 192S. All students, men 
and women, sufficiently proficient and interested, are welcomed to the organ- 
ization. 



Rehearsals are held regularly on Thursday evenings at seven o'clock. From time 
to time the orchestra plays at various college functions. 

OFFICERS 

Donald B. Moldimiaiir - Ass'/. Director & Manager 
Gerald G. Trader ------ President 

Frank T. Mann ... . Secretary ; j Treasurer 

Mildred E. Nickel Librarian 

Dalos H. Grobe Director 

E. J. Ray Adviser 



MEMBERS 



1 VELYN R. ADES 
ERODE ANDERSON 
Bl RNHAB r a. BEGUHN 
EVELYN A. BORCHFRT 
l EONARD A. BRO^ I 

[ames h. dotsfth 
irma gilbi:ris^\ 

DAMII (,K!!\ 

FRAN( is i GRIFFITH 
GEORGE C. HI RRM1 YFR 



LOIS L. LAMON 

DONA1 i) UND 

FRANK T. MANN 

KAK! I. Ml! I I K 

DONALD B. MOLDENHAUER 

MILDRED L NICKJ L 

HAROLD RASSMLsMN 

I 1)NX ARD ROSFNFFLDT 

GEORGE S. SOUTH I K\ 

GERALD G. TRADER 




Eightjhthrtt 








Bertha Tainter Annex 

Bertha Tainter Annex, located on the shore of Lake Menomin just a short walk 
from the main buildings of the college, was built in 1T08 by the school to serve as a 
residence hall for «.ixt\ -four -iris. 



HOUSE OFFICERS 



LUCILLL Hl-.BL 

Martha B 
Irene W'ii i iams 
Freda M. Bac hman 



IIS S« HMIDT 
|l AN AMIDON 
I ERINI 1 BM1 R 

Preceptress 



MEMBERS 



I VI I YX AIIIN 
il AN AMIDON 
EVELYN ANDERSON 
si LMA ANDERSON 
MARCELLA BECK! K 

II I ANOR BE< KIR 
VIRGINIA I-I c IITOLD 

\I K I Hi l DON 
DOROTHY BOODY 
RUTH B ASM LMAN 
MARTHA BUBE( K 
MINNIE < HRONi 

I I RXA DAMS 
MARIETTA DeCRAMER 
M tRGARI T DODDS 
( Mill RIM I BMI R 
VIVIAN FLORIN 

l\\l FOELLER 
RUTH GRAHAM 
MARIANNE HAGMAN 
VIRGINIA HARM is 

M \! s HAM S 



I UCILLE HEBL 
1RI XI HI 11)1 
EMMA HI R MAN 
LILLY JOHNSON 
MARIAN KRAKI R 
DOROTHY l.ATHROP 
LOUISE LEE 
MARIORII LEONARD 
IINNT1 LONGAR 
DORIS LINKER 
anni ! ii McDONAl D 
CHARLOTTE McNAB 
HARRIET MELG1 S 
GLADYS MIKKELSON 
< A I HI R1N1 MORRIS 

NELSON 
MILDRED NELSON 
I INK I Nl I SON 
IXE2 XII NOW 
WINIFRED PRIEBE 
MARIOX RIIIEE 
MARGARET ROI [TIGER 



IAN IT ROBERTSON 
111 II N s< HNAS1 
CHARLOTTE SCHULDT 

US S< HMIDI 
LAURETTA SCHMIDT 
MARY SHEARER 
ARLEXE SJASTROM 
CARMEN SPREI I I R 
HERTHA STEENBERG 
LILA STORXDT 
LYSLE THOMAS 
JOEVA TODD 
JUNE TRASTEK 
EDITH UGLOW 
AGNES vi NBERG 
ELEANOR VERGIN 
MILDRED VOSS 
SARAH VTALRATH 
VIOLET WAlsiROM 

ANNA WlsIAlAN 
IRIN! \MI 1 IAMS 
OLIVE WILLS 



Page Eight) 




// /'.- better to hate loved and lost — much better. 



4. Carol: "Good morning. Professor." 

Prof.: "Well, what of it? I didn't make it." 

6. Stoutonia issues announcement of rating sheets. 

7. Stout trims the Elm wood Yellow Jackets in a charity game. 

12. The band gives it to us in assembly. The two solo numbers were exceptionally 
good. 

I7. The boys broadcast again. They are pleasing the radio audience. 

19. MA. P.'s present "The Neighbors." We sure did laugh. Dean Bowman hopes 
we'll have three thousand dollars' worth of fun during Easter recess. 

20. A Spring Style Show parades to a packed house. The Stout clothing exhibit 
wasn't so slow. 

21. Carl announces his intention to stag the Prom. 



Pagt Eighty-five 




./ college man likes j girl beautiful and dumb, — beautiful enough to please bint, 
but dumb i nough to like him. 



23. Stori makes the all-conference basketball team. We're proud of you, Dave. 

24. A popular person is one who enjoys being bored. 
26. Freshman assembly. They told the Sophs. 

2y. Two's company; three's a crowd, in any telephon.' booth. 
28. Red: "You look unusually nice this morning." 
Eldrid: "Yes, by contrast." 



April 



1. Don't laugh! You'll bite, too, 

2. Faculty praises rating sheets. 
3-6. Easter recess. 

7. Everybody bankrupt, — after having spent three thousand dollars on fun. 
New scenery for the M. A. P.V 

Faculty members buy new cars. 

"stout onia out a half hour early. 

Sprig has cub. Pete and Prebe pick posies. 

Bill Murray used mayonnaise dressing in absence of stacomb. Made a big hit 

with the women. 

Stout boys visit Colfax High School, — prospecting. 



8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
13. 

14. 



Page 







.\ bachelor h a fellou who didn't have a car when be wax young. 



15. Tower goes to press. Maybe. 
I7. Carl Roll announces Prom queen. 

20. Many alumni back for spring vacations. 
Dating rate raised temporarily. 

21. Professor Ray shows what the better dressed arc wearing this season. 

22. Wilson Creek open. Orpheum balcony deserted. 
27. Vi'e heard: The wedding guest he beat his breast. 

The bells began to toil. 

But still the stud refused to go 

Into the buttonhole. 

30. "My dcah! I feah you have rent youah tuxedo!" 
"Not rent, sweetheart. — borrcv. 



May 



1. There may be more women than men in the world: but I bet that fact wouldn't 
be believed tonight. 

2. Junior Prom the last word in social events. 
4. Administration charts and canoeing conflict. 







"Of course universitiei arc full of knowledge — the freshmen bring a little in, 
and the seniors take little an ay, so if accumulati 

— President Lowell of Harvard. 



in. 



IS. 

16. 
18. 
24. 
2?. 
26. 

27- 
28. 
29. 



I'm going to sell books this summer, *o I'll be seeing you. 
Are you doing anything for charity? 
Yes. I'm working for my father. 
Stout sluggers have good season. 

Paradise Valley and posie pickers synonymous. 
Mother, there is a blind man at the dour. 
Tell him we don't want any. 

(.Belter read thit again.) 
Tower issued to students. Also maybe. 
Faculty women entertain Senior women. 
Love is the illusion that one woman differs from the rest. 
Baccalaureate address. 

Senior reception by Deans Price and Bowman. 
Field day. 
Class day. 

We commence to commence to commence. 
Goodbye! 






Page Eighty-eight 





FRESHMEN 


















The Freshman Class 

THE class of 1934 aspires to be the greatest class ever to 
have attended The Stout Institute, wishing to claim that 
distinction by virtue not only of numbers but of 
achievements. That is a lofty aim in any college where the 
competition is as keen as it is at Stout. 

We make no vain boast that wc have really realized that 
hope; we do claim that our record is promising. Though at 
first considered merely a surging mob, wc had the strength and 
the organization necessary to vanquish the so-called mighty 
Sophomores. Wc have becoma an active group in the college 
with a good representation in every extra-curricular activity. 

We have made good records not only in outside activities 
but in the class room as well. With our present high standards, 
we should pass through our remaining years at Stout with 
colors flying. 

OFFICERS 
Scott Davison -------- President 

Eunice Nelson Vice-?rcshicnt 

Virginia Thompson ------ Secretary 

Patrick O'Connor ------ Treasurer 



Page 




3 



-- 






R O'Connor 



l-l "^/ v 





: ON V "THOMPSON 




130 





3. fji^ «w«ra E* Lre- J. TraStek 




B. Dec^MN M. Rocttic«» R. Larson C. NeisoN M. Osgood M.Owc-n 




tROON J. Dor-' CN3TN JGooo P. S- L.Lf-r- 




/ '•'>.• Xinely-ont 













Nl. NtcK.ro. M. Nei^ori WhuHnncTor. J. Amidon j. LctiocKv C. Mcrman 




f^Sisset. tt.WoiNowbKr A.MAYrs E*. FXulson B Stccvts M Dodos 




W. BArrrR D Booov I. D*/is J. Tooo R.FbRceu. H.5TrcfiBr«c 



n 



<*1 


^L» *- ^H 


^■r ' 1 


■F* *""^M 


Bfe^ ^B 



r.Ai^r-N G. Townt- L.MvRrLL M. Lirwis Nl. Rhifl D.Cain 






rate 




H Stroziwky C. McCakty R. 5ossclm*n c. Harmon p- Kuee- J. VfcRv 




A. McDonald C. C R Johnson f Mumcs £ lVrnhart R.Graham 




V. Da D. 5oi 



TON 






H i. a t m ma mm m a 

. RuSLcr A. Stark O Madscn M.Hanson G Miutnoach I. Wiu»an3 





W. TrtOMA"5 A. Sjostrom h KRUECrR H Rasvl 



Arjrr Xincty-threc 



W SttiNBCRc. lAf»M9 A 5CWC055W* O Ln r - BiWW< 






GOl-^fN P.C»*V L.BlWWP A 7QAJ«OWiC2 O iNCAlt* C Sr 

mil . 

L WinpS M.SKrAM« RANOeRSON MACAUcrv C M.*«ruSON 




C HVLIAND M. L*OM*<»© L STC.WAJ40T J HOCHK H S*.NOVIO 



Pa^f Aim" 












SPRING SPORTS 










Baseball 

ALTHOUGH baseball had been discontinued for several 
. ai the first call for men a large number reported. 
New equipment and a fairly large schedule, including 
River Falls, Eau Claire, and St. Thomas, proved to be 
incentive, and the competition was good. The material was 
green, and of the rawest kind, but the spirit was excellent. 
ral inter-team games were played for experience; others 
were played with the Mcnomonic Blue Caps. The games were 
verj well attended by large groups. There is good promise for 
the future of baseball in Stout's athletic program. 






I'nce ,V( 







Track 

ABOUT cwenty-eight men reported for track. They 
worked whole-heartedly in preparation for meets with 
Eau Claire, Oshkosh, and Superior. After intensive pre- 
liminary work, the team was taken outside where the men 
worked for the development of form and endurance. The 
season was successful and great interest was shown. 



NUMBERS OF THE SQUAD 


A. ANDERSON 


i. KUBE 


W. BERFIE1 I) 


R. McNAUGH 


I. BUSS 


J. Nl is- 


< OSSETTE 


1 . 1'Alil 


J. CRONK 


R. PURCELL 


s DAVISON 


II. G. KANDK Ki K 


A. DAUGHERTY 


H. H. RANDE< Ki K 


\\. HUNTINGTON 


L. SCHNEIDER 


C. HYLLAND 


H. HYER 


J. HARMON 


E. CARLSON 


G. JOHNSON 


R. LC KI K! I 


J. JOHNSON 


JOHN RUDE 











"Our Pro" 
RUSSFII. ViWU.lX 



Golf 

WITH only two of last year's successful golf team re- 
turning, several tournaments ami eliminations were 
held to determine the places on the team to represent 
the school. The conference singles and team championships. 
and a sweep in intercollegiate meets seem inevitable with the 
strong lineup Stout will put forth. 






Page Xinety-figlit 



ORGANIZATION 










Page Ome Hundred 







- lL 



.'.-Caimont 




Page One Hundred One 





P. Ver*ORic»«. 

- Pwr-SICHTNT- 




R. MlCM&ELS 
- AoviSf" - 



HOME- 

— Cjlub — 



L. &UCMAJMA1N 




E-.Anobrson 





C". Cuiwan 



M.Se 



:;-r.v-.../r*l 1/ 





^*. Npwby M. DcCT«AN*rR G Quartm»s D. Hpnrv 













-T,r-. or- 



P ZlMMFKNAN 



El 

li 

3t«OIANT »»AW> 





r-.Oit-».o 

Tire. & Tfcr-AV 










Girls' Glee Club 

THE twenty-two members of the Girls* Glee Club form a group that is really 
interested in the study of the best in classical and modern music. 

Chosen from the stud.-nt body after a voice test, they are given the oppor- 
tunity of learning and improving their sight reading, and of improving and developing 
their voices. 

In addition to giving an annual spring concert, the club entertains the assembly 
several times during the year and takes part in the Christmas program. 

OFFICERS 

ssen President 

Miwu: Chronqlist .... Vice-President 

Marian Kroker Secretary 

Rhoda Rossler - Treasurer 

Catherine Ebmer Librarian 

Joeva Todd -------- Librarian 

Miss Hilda Bai.erld Director 



MEMBERS 
I irsi Sopranos 



VIRGINIA THOMPSON 
VINNIIRM) PRIEB1 
LOIS LAMON 



DOROTHY BOODY 
GRACJ LINDERSON 
CARMEN SPRIETER 



U AN GOOD 

[OEVA TODD 

RHODA ROSSLER 

a IARLOTTE VATCHORN 



Second Sopranos 



MARIAN KRAKER 
!RMA GI! V! RTSON 
\\\! WESTMAN 
VIRGINIA HORMS 



Altos 



\ STARK 
( AIHI KIN! I BM1 R 
MARIAN RHli I 
MABEL NM RGARD 



MINNII CHRONi 

SSEN 
LEONARD 

ANITA GL'NDI ACK 






Page One Hundr.- 



®I 



HRasmussw* 





Miss BAtRuoe- 





K. Conck 




*® 



M.CmronquiST 
- Vicr-FVr-a - 






M Krakm^ 



R Rosstt-eR. J. TOOD 




Page One }i 






T 



Y. W. C. A. 

HE Young Somen's Christian Association, one of the 
oldest organizations on the campus, has had a member- 
ship of over a hundred girls during this year. 



Throughout the year the members have endeavored to create 
a spirit of Christian fellowship and purposeful living in keeping 
with the aim of the world-wide association. 

OF1 ICERS 
Hinkii in QUILLING Prcutl.il/ 

Belinda Hendrickson Vice-President 

ALICE LYNUM Secretary 

CHARLOTTE M< Nabb - ■ Treasurer 

Lorkmm Litchfield .... Membership Chairman 
Georgia Aber ... - Worh drip Chairman 

ALICE HaSLERUD Social Chairman 

Ardella Anderson Program Chairman 

ADVISERS 

Miss MI< H MISS MILLER 

MISS kN MISS 

Miss BACH MAN 






Pace One h 













I'aif 
















o 



Stout Rifle Club 

RGANIZED May 10, 1928. and affiliated shortly 
thereafter with the National Rifle Association, the club 

now consists of thirty-five members. 



From May 1 to November 1. the shooting is done on the 
outdoor range with high-powered guns. During other months 
of the school year, the practice takes place on the indoor range 
with 22 caliber rifles. 

era! matches have been fired against rifle teams of 
other schools and also against city teams. 

OI 1 ICERS 

Kueben Hagen President 

Paul C. Nklson Vice-President 

Homlr Rose Treasurer 

Caroline Brick Secretary 

Paul C Nelson faculty Adviser 



Pogt On 



J Eitht 










Marquette-LaSalle Club 

THE Marquette-LaSalle Club is the organization com- 
posed of Catholic men and women enrolled in The Stout 
Institute. It endeavors to promote relationships and 
the common interests of its members: to co-operate with 
other organizations of the college in social and other af- 
fairs; and to serve as an agent in the development and perpetu- 
ation of high moral character. 

The Club won first place in the annual "Home-coming" 
parade with a float representing Father Marquette's journey 
through our state. 

OFFICERS 

Henry Link President 

Mar v Jam Dodson Vice-President 

W'iijiam Murray Secretary 

Edward Gii.ifs Treasurer 

H. M. Hansen Faculty Adviser 

Fabian Schrank Vacuity Adviser 



Pate One 1! 
















Honor Awards for 1930 

AT commencement time six students were thj recipients of college honors. The 
Eichelberger Scholarships were awarded to two students fn m the Junior class 
and to two from the Sophomoie class, on the basis of scholarship, personality, 
future possibilities, social attitude, and value to the school. Ardella Anderson 
and Ernest Christensen, Juniors, and Ethel Anderson and Robert Reick, Sophomores, 
each received the award of enc hundred dollars. 

The custom initiated in 1928 of giving honors to the two Freshmen who ranked 
highest in scholarship was again observed. The students honored were Belinda Hcn- 
drickson and C -'Void Nauta. 











Junior Prom 

TI IE fifth annual Junior Promenade was one of the most elaborate affairs of 
the year. It was held is usual in the Stout Gymnasium which had been beau- 
tifully decorated in rainbow colors. 

Miss Eldrid Wike, as Prom Queen, and Mr. Carl Roll, as Prom Kins;, led the grand 

march. 

\\'c considered ourselves very fortunate in having Fred Dexter's Pennsylvanians 
to add to the gayety of the evening. They played five beautiful waltzes and nine 
peppv fox troi 

GUESTS OI HONOR 

President ^nii Mrs. B. i \elson Dean and Mrs. C. A. Bowman 

Dean Ruth E. Michaels Dean and Mrs. M. M. Price 

CHAPERON! S 
Mr. .md Mrs. I". Keith Miss Violet I 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

General Chairman Carl Roll 

'.ion Harold Hyer 

ration Cvengros 

Entertainment 

Finance Leon Haase 

ting - - - - - - - Albert Anderson 

Program ------ Charles Cryderman 

Publicity Gertrude Kellman 

Invitations ... ... Jdine And 

Refreshments Elizabeth Curran 






Marvin Fladoes 

1910—1931 
From the misty shores of midnight, 

touched U/ith splendors of the n;oo,;. 
To the singing fides of heat en, and the 
more clear than noon, 
J u soul that grew to man 
till it nas with God in tune. 

Silence here — for lot e /s silent, 

<$g on the lessening sail; 
Silence here, for grief is i oil 

when the mighty minstrels fail; 

Silence here — hut far beyond us, 
many i oices crying. Had'. 

— Adapted from Henry Van Dyke 




MARVIN II ADOES 















W^. 


' Js vA U 




PL- ■ \ 








The President's Home 



Browsing 



Taint er Annex 



Around 



Homemakcrs Cottage 



Stout 



Lynwood Hall 

(Boys' Dormitory) 






I'ate One II" 



Clothing Economics 



Browsing 



Nurserj School 



Through 



Advanced Design 



Stout 



Meal Planning 







Pag* One Hundred Fifteen 






-O 




A Printing Class 



Browsing 



Wood Finishing 
Practice Class 



Through 



Free Hand Drawing 



Stout 



Wood Working 
Practice Class 






Page One Hundred Sixteen 












Biology Class 



Browsing 



The Auditorium 



Through 



Harvey Memorial 
(Girls* Room) 



Stout 



The library 







Pate One Hundred Seventeen 






At the Crossroads 

You to the left and I to the right, 

For the ways of men must sever — 

.1//./ // well may be for a </<n and a ///.'</>/, 
And it well mas be forever. 

But whether we meet or u bether we part 

(For our ways arc past our knowitfg) 
A pledge to the heart from it\ fellow heart 

On the ways we all arc going! 

Luck'. 

For we knou not where we are going. 

D □ □ 

Yntt /o the left and I to the right, 
For the way i oj men must 

And it well may be for a day and a night 
And it well ma) he foreter! 

But whether we live or whether we die 

(For the end is past our knowing). 
Hue arc frank hearts and an open sky, 

/>. w fair or an ill wind blowing! 
Here's luck! 

In the teeth of all winds blowing. 

— Adapted from Richard Hove) 



Pact One Hundred Eighteen 



The Tower 

1931 



E. A. WOLTER 

Editor-in-Chief 



•^ ->- 



ROBERT REICK 

Business Manager 






The Tower 
of 

Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-One 



Published by the 

Junior Class 

of 

The Stout Institute 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 






. 










FOREWORD 















T 



HE 1931 Tower Staff has tried to make 
this book an innovation in annuals. En- 
deavoring to compile a record of the 
activities of the year in the order of their hap- 
pening, we have made our theme the three sea- 
sons of Fall, Winter, and Spring. 

We have devoted an entire section of the 
1931 Tower to the Seniors. In accordance with 
our theme, this section comes at the end of their 
school life and at the "commencement" of their 
professional life. 

We hope that this book may be a chronicle 
of pleasant memories. 








CONTENTS 



BOOK ONE 
The College 



BOOK TWO 
The Fall Season 

BOOK THREE 

The Winter Season 

BOOK FOUR 

The Spring Season 

BOOK FIVE 

The Seniors 























































Trees 

/ think that I shall never ice 
A poem lovely as a free. 

A tree whose hungry month is prest 
Against the earth's tweet flowing breast; 

A tree that looks at God all day, 
And lifts her leafy anus to pray; 

A tree that may in Summer wear 
A nest of robins in her hair; 

Upon whose bosom snou has lain; 
Who intimately lives with rain. 

Poems are made by fools like me. 
But only God can make a tree. 

— Joyce Kilmer 




/ bear laki water lapping with 
lou sounds /'i / 

— W. B. Yeats 




The cherished fields 

Put on their u inter robe of purest white. 

— James Thomson 




.../ aboi e, no earth belou . — 
A universe of ict and snow! 

—J. G. Whitt.ei 




Out t again 

Do 1 behold tlnsc steep ami loft) cliffs, 
That on a wild secluded scene impress 
Thoughts of more deep seclusion. 

— William Wordsworth 


















BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

STOUT 

INSTITUTE 









E.J.Keaxney Louis 1 



oen 




aether ?. i .Schoeiuarm 

^^ J.Z.Wkyte 

jjfl ^ Geo.P.KamCi 
"j^nCaUate* Secretary Vbyk ^BefcT 








- 



Dedication 

THE Stout Institute was taken over from private ownership 
and was made a state institution in 1911. Simultaneously 
provision was made for a State Board of Trustees which 
was identical in personnel with the State Board of Vocational Educa 
tion. 

Mr. II. E. Miles was the first President of the Board serving 
from 1911 to 1 9 1 7. In 191 7 Mr. E. W. Schultz. President of the 
Xorthficld Company of Sheboygan, succeeded to the presidency and 
has been in continuous service as president ever since that date. .\nd 
Mr. Schultz has been a member of the Board of Trustees since its 
creation in 1911. 

The Board of Trustees consists of eleven members, nine of 
whom are appointed by the Governor. Two members of the board 
are nominated in the act which created the board and serve as ex- 
ofticio members. They are Mr. John Callahan, State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, and Mr. Voyta Wr.ibet/. of the State Indus- 
trial Commission. Of the nine members of the board, three of 
them, as provided in the law. represent employers of labor, three .ir. 
chosen from the employee group, and three represent agriculture. 
Mr. George P. Hambrccht. Director o? Vocational Education for 
the State of Wisconsin, is Secretary of the Board of Trustees. The 
Board, unless otherwise specially convened, holds quarterly meetings 
for the transaction of its business on the fourth Tuesday of July. 
October, January, and April. The first three of these meetings are 
held in Milwaukee or Madison. The April meeting is usually held 
in Menomonie. 

Therefore, on this, the twentieth anniversary of the creation of 
the Board of Trustees, and likewise, the twentieth anniversai 
the creation of The Stout Institute as a state institution, we, the 
of 1932, dedicate this 1951 copy of the TOWER to the officers 
and members of the Beard of Trustees in recognition of the two 
decades of sen ice that these friends have unselfishly given to The 
Stout Institute. 






11 












Alma Mater 

On the [yanks of Lake Meuomin 

Stands our Alma Mater true 

With tower high and brilliant "S"; 

For her we'll dare and do. 

We'll sing her praises many, 

We'll glorify her name. 

And on throughout the years of time, 

Our love for Stout proclaim. 






in 




BURTON" E. NELSON 
President 



IV 




The Dignity of Teaching 

TEACHING as a profession is each year becoming more highly 
respected. Year by year it is becoming less a vocation in 
which is gained the preparation and the experience for a 
more lucrative and a more permanent business. Young people now 
pretty generally expect to continue in the educational field when they 
have once entered it. 

This favorable condition is due somewhat to the fact that the 
intelligent and directing forces in the molding of public sentiment 
demand preparation for teaching before one may begin to teach. 
It is due somewhat to the fact that teachers are better paid than 
formerly. It is due in a small way to a most important factor 
which almost within a decade has become a teaching incentive. 
Provision is now made for the comfortable retirement of teachers 
when the duties of effective leadership are ended. It is due in some 
measure to the tact that teachers are no longer a class unto them- 
selves. They are as essentially like and as much a part of the com- 
munity as arc the members of other professions. One no longer 
apologizes for his part in the educational work of the state. 

The specialist is now recognized in education just as he is 
recognized in medicine, law, and engineering. Stout graduates arc 
and should be as definitely outstanding in their field as the specialists 
in any other profession. For this reason. Stout students arc fortunate 
in their selection of a new and distinct field of education. 

Stout students, however, must consistently continue research 
studies, studies in the science and literature of education and in in- 
dustry, because the field of education which they have chosen is 
not stabilized. Educational procedures arc no more established here 
than are the practices in the industrial operations nor in the dis- 
tribution of products, nor yet in the efficiency of machines. We, 
more than any other group of teachers, must be influenced by social 
and industrial developments. Constant study lies at the foundation 
of success and progress. 








CLYDE A. BOWMAN 
of the ScIjooI of Industrial Education 



RUTH E. MICH A I I S 
Dean of the School of Home Economics 




VI 










; . :'\ \ . i; ■ 
Biological Sclent «• 



Cl MIS 



Hanv B\lirli> 

• for Women 



Arthur G. Brown 

L.Ih, 




Mary Lolkf Bui 
foods 



Alice M. Bvrcoin 
Cafeteria Management 



Earl L. Blrbridce 
il Education, Coaching 



Glrir' I MUX 

jnh 



VII 













In LIAX 
Relate J Aril 



Frfd L. CURRAN 
hiJmlrial Education 



Margaret Wixnoxa Crcisl 
Nutrition 



Walter B. Davison 

Social S. 




John Favii i i Jr. 
Social Science 



Alma M. Ganz 
Horn, Economic! Education 



Acnes i . Filler 

Home Administration 



H. F. Good 
Auto Mechanics, Electrical U"orA, Science 






VIII 










Ren 




\v 


Daniei Green 

■:e Drafting 


C. V. Hacci 


H. M. Ha 
Ad it nerd Woodwork 





Pl^j 














■^*l 



VlOl i i M. Hassler 
Public Spoking 



Lillian Jeter 
Clot hint, Related Art 



Marif.l Hopkins 
Experimental Cookery 



Thomas W. (ohnson 

Wood turning, Slxet Me til 



IX 
















Floyd Kijim 
General Metjh, Sheet Metal 



: I. Leeoom 
Clxmiitry 



R vt V. Kranzvm h 

Auto \i. .-I.,. 1 1., 'tic Mecfanict 



Mary M. McCalmoNT 

Cbemiitry 




Mary I. M< 1 

Education 



K\riu kn McKlNN S 
Assistant * 



Mirnv M. Miller 

-■/ S< .•. nee 

H. C Mc 

Machine S/iop Practice. Foundry VTork, 
Pattcrnmaking 
















M\mii Russi i l 
Relate,! Art 



Grace M. Price 

■ nel Home Economic! Education 



Pail C. 
Element* of WooJuork, Carpentry, \TooJ finishing 



Miri.e M. Price 
y, Dean of Men 




J- I 
Architectural D 
Freehand Drawing, Brh 
Concrete Work 



F. E. Tlstisox 
Matlxmatu t, S . Home Mecl>anict 



Fabian Soikank 
Assistant Coach 



Hazel Van N'iss 
Clothing 




\l 













I i i i v W . W I 
ffomi 



Clari M \iiii V 

1 



R. I . Vi 
.•>.' In.hu: 



I Dow 
HjIIs juJ Ilouiinx 




B. M. Fl NK 

Busmen \\*n*zcr 



. \\ INMv)N 

AultUni <•• R 



(ii mum M. OBmi n 



Helen B. Si wi rlok 

Gtncral Office 






XII 










Cl \K\ YOMR 

Stenographer 



But i i ,\ 
Auistjnt Librtiuit 



Myrtle Strand 

Aisittatit Lifnjruii 



I ii i i\x M. Froccatt 
Library Administration 






XIII 












Autumn 

The morns are meeker than they . 
The nuts are getting brown; 
The berry's cheek is plumper, 
The rose is out of town. 
The maple wears a gayer scarf, 
The field a scarlet gonn. 
Lest I should be old-fashioned, 
77/ put a trinket on. 

— Emily Dickinson 






XII 



Autu 



mn 



Bill see the jading 
Many-colored u oods, 

Shade deepening oier shade. 

The country round 
I m brown; a crowning umbrage 

Dusk and dun. 
Of every hue, from nan 

Declining green to sooty dark. 

Iron. Till SI 

Jami % Thompson 




AUTUMN 



Senior Class 

\T7 THEN graduation brings our college days to a close 
W/ suddenly rind ourselves at the goal toward which we 
** have striven for the past tour years. With its ap- 
proach we reali/e more and more that it is but a step toward 
the attainment of a fuller life. 

What wc have gained through our contact with teachers 
and students at Stout has to a great measure depended upon 
what wc have given. I low we continue to grow will depend 
upon how we serve, for as wc enter the teaching field we dedi- 
cate ourselves to Service. Our influence in shaping the life 
and character of youth will increase .i- the years go by. and our 
responsibility toward them is indeed great. 

As wc bid our farewell to our Alma Mater, let us take with 
us the fondest memories of our college days, and pledge our- 
selves to support the aims and principles for which our college 
stands, "for high ideals, for high attainment and ever higher 
attainment in mental growth through the acquisition and use 
of worthwhile knowledge, in skill of hand, in teaching ability, 
in sense of personal responsibility, in respect for the rights of 
others, in will and power to render worthy service." 

— /. \\". Dockar. 



OH ICERS 



President 

"President (Second Seme; 
dent 

\uret 

tar) 



Paul S< hoi noi i 

J. W. DOCKAK 

Gl ORGIA All! R 

l.KM si Ml I 1 1 K 

Anita Gcnui \« 11 




PRESIDENT BURTON E. NELSON 






Class of 1931 



WITH graduation goes freedom of a sort. You no longer are obliged to do set 
tasks at set times. You are not bound to co-ordinate your activities with 
those of the group. Certain restrictions imposed upon you for the good of 
the community in which you have been living will affect you now only as you 
choose to respect them. Without serious reflection, one might for a moment fed 
that there has come a release from responsibility. Such freedom, however, is never 
possible. With you, along the road that you will travel, in this particular decade of 

'30'$, your responsibility will be greater than it has been for many other people 
covering a long period of years. 

You arc living in a critical period — a period when civilization in its social, busi- 
ness, and religious standards is unsettled and uncertain. The race is in no sense sure 
of itself. Many educational agencies for profit are adding to the general turmoil of 
thought. Xo great philosopher stands at the crossroad to direct your way. The 
current literature of today i\ in no sense helpful. 

There has been, recently, a lowering of business standards throughout the business 
world. Wealth, at any cost, has been dominant in the policies of individuals and 
corporations. If made as a general statement, that would hardly be true. It is, 
however, true that high ethical standards in business and business relationships have 
suffered tremendously during the years following the World War. 

Moral standards have changed or are being interpreted in terms of more liberal 
thought. "The old fogy" and the "youthful radical" are ages apart. There is no 
accepted middle ground. The social senses .ire dulled so that no standard of honesty or 

ce or common law or of internation.il good will seem to be worth righting for. 
The new generation will have many problems to solve, many adjustments and readjust- 
ments to make. A revision of social and relij tndards must follow, and some- 
what later international understanding and good will must come. 

You are now going out into this maelstrom of conflicting opinions, uncertain 
Standards, and international prejudice. Your opportunity is unusual. Your responsi- 
bility will, therefore, be very great. Because of this opportunity to serve, you arc to 
be congratulated. I am sure that in working for yourself you will be working for 
t rhers, and I am just as firmly convinced that in working for others you will be 
working for yourself. You may not always get what you wish for. but you are 
pretty sure to get what you work for. The extent of your reward will be measured 

tur ambition, sincerity, and perseverance, and by your respect for yourself. 

The world today lacks great leadership. It is woefully short of great teachers, 
preachers. Iaw-giver$, and great statesmen. from the ranks of the college 
graduates of 1931 may come a commanding personality capable of leading a puzzled 
>le mto highways of sanity and safety. 

There remains only one road to national security and world peace. The masses 
must be taught to think independently. They must be made to read and interpret 
the history of the ages in the light of present conditions. They must someday insist 
upon sane legislation beneficial to all classes. They will then obey willingly all laws 
imposed because of their real merit and justice; and respect for law and order will 
be restored. Someday we shall distinguish between the politician and the statesman. 
Then we shall be prepared to judge questions on merit rather than on prejudice. 

Here for the present is your responsibility and your opportunity. Your work will 
b< well done when you train for efficient employment and for independent thinking 
those for whom you are responsible, and additional rewards will come when you influence 
your community to higher standards of life and living. 




Ill 










Paul L. S< hoi mm f 

Mcnomonic, Vi'i*. 

President Seniori lirst Semester, 

s Club, S. T. S. 



Ik \m !< P. W'miiivc; 

Mcnomonic, Wis. 

President DcMolay. S. T. S., 

Tower 



Vivian E. Hi im 
Ettcrick, Wii. 

-Yu" 
Stoutonia, Philomathcan, Areme 



Arnoid J. Diitricii 

Ccdarburj:. Wii, 

Rifle Club 




Gborou H 

Racine, Wis. 
"A 
w . \. A . Vice-President Areme, 
Y. V. C. A., Stoutonia 



< . ! \KS.>\ 

Mcnomonic. Wis. 
"Bi»l]»" 
Tower, Stoutonia, President 
S. T. S.. Y. M. < \. 



Carol J. McCi UftC 
Menomonie, Wit. 

"Carri/) " 
President S. M. A., Vice-President M. A. P. 



Ai i< i H. II\si i rih 

Crookston, Minn. 

M, A P., Areme. Lutheran Students 

Philomathcan 









[V 







Ik i ni Stoltz 
Schlervillc. Vk 



MahcLUIII A. SUTHEkLAKD 

Hndton, Vis. 

Y. W. C. A. 



Lucia n I. Pawi in 

Holland. Mich. 

"S" Club. Marquettc-LaSalle 



EDMUND C. Villars 
Elgin, III. 




John W. Nothom 

Arkansas \\ \ .. 

"luck" 

Metallurgy, Marquettc-LaSallc 



EV1 I.YN A. BORCHERT 

Mcnomonic, "9t ' •■-- 



Marjorie F. Ckonk 
Mcnomonic. Wit. 



Thomas B. Jlngck 
Mcnomonic, Wi». 










Petfr P. Zimmi : Henry a. I ink 




Aurora, Minn. Columbia. Wis. 




"P<7, "Bob" 




President Marqucite-l aSalle, 




M. A. P.. Rifle Club 




Marietta C. Di Cramer 


Mary A. Hrys 


Ojhkojh. Vk ,. 


Mclro*c, W is. 


"fritz" 


Science Club 


Treasurer 




W. A. A.. Science Club 






Welcome Richards 




Eovard E. Richards 




Menomonic. ^ 'is. 




Columbus Vis. 




"Bud" 




"S" Club. Rifle Club 






ROBI.RT B 




hi «\n FORSI UNO 




Mcnomonie, ^ i-. 




La Cros»c. Wis. 




"Bob" 











■*'. DCM K \K 

Mcnomonic. Wis. 

"Scot/if" 

Stoutonia. President Seniors 

Forum, Tower 



Rov B 
Viroqua, Vis. 



Sarah Lor a WaW 
Glasgow. Kv. 
"Kentucky 1 
Y. W. C. A. 



Mabi i- C. Nllrcaard 
Kenosbt, Wis. 

■\Un" 

Aremc, Glee Club, 

Science Club 




C. Dodge 

Menomonie. Wis. 

"C/whe" 

Rifle Club, Y. M. C. A.. 

Sketch Club 



Bi RNMARO C. HACI N 

Decorah, Iowa 

"Bd> 

Trca\urer M. A. P.. Forum, 

Lutheran Students 



Helca R ISM 
Racine. Wis. 

Glee Club, Science Club 



Helen C Novak 
Cobb. ^ 
Philomathcan. Science Club, 
Y. V. C A. 



VII 







Ri in E. BaSSUI Ml k 

Sheboygan, Wis. 

"Ru.h" 

Philomathean, Y. W. C. A. 



Ill li N H. IU NKEI 
Mcnomonic, Wis. 

President Hjrperun, Y. W. C. A. 



Ri tin n K. Hacf.n 

Waseca, Minn. 

"Ruhr 

Glee Club, Lutheran Students, 

Rifle Club, V. U. ( V 



Marcviritl Hart JOHNSON 

"M-rg" 

Hannibal, Mo. 

S. M. A. 




I \i i * \ M. (.11 II 

Mcnomonic. Wis. 

"Ev" 

V. V. C. A., Science Club 



Ernest Chrism nu n 

A»hland, V* in. 

"Cbrh/i" 

President S. S. A., Forum, Stoutonia, 

M. A. P., Tower 



Anita M. Glndi m h 

Livingston. Wis. 

".V;/j" 

Glee Club. Band. Stoutonia Staff, 

Hypcrians, Secretary, Seniors 



I r\\< i . W. Im HI i i t>r 
Mcnomonic, wit 
"Fan in " 
President W. A. A.. Hyncrian, Arcmc, 
Y. W. C. A., Athletic Council 









\ HI 







Edna K. Din-mi s 
Menomonie, Wis. 



Menomonie. Wis. 



Nicholas Marsimo 

Eiazeltoa, Pa. 

"Nick" 



A: . :n W. HOEFFLIN 
Mavvillc. >X'i-s. 




Louis E. Ji 
Ashland. Wis. 



Carom \ i Anns Brick 

Manitowoc. Wis. 

"Carol" 

Secretary Lutheran Students, 

Secretary Rifle Club. Y. W. ( V 



Dorothy F. Wi 
Menomonie. Wis. 
"Do/" 
S. M. A. 



Homi r C 
Augusta, Wis. 

"Rout" 

Treasurer Rifle Club. Y. M. C. A. 

Sketch Club, Tumbling 






;\ 










I \n \ b. Rysserc 
Alpha. Mich. 

Forum 



Lawri.no W. $j 
Hopkins, Minn. 
"Diii/y 



AXICl COCKFRILL 

Alamo. Texas 

"Cocky" 

Philomathean, M. A. P. 



JOSI IMIINI O. i : 

Wadena. Minn. 

"Joe" 

\\ . A. A.. Marquette-] a Salle. 

Hyperian. Y. W. C. A. 













-f 


I 


t 


— - 



Or vim: A. Ci i v. 
Mcnomonie. 1 



RlSMII. Vi'ALLIN 

Villnur, Minn. 
"R:, 
M. A. P., "S" Club 



Earl A. Petfrson 

Republic, Mich. 

Rifle Club, President Metallurgy 



i mm\ M. ANDERSON 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

"Em"' 

Y. V. C. A.. Science Club 








Prank A. I 
Mcnomonic, Wis. 
Stoutonia Staff, Glee Club 



Charlotte E. Vatchorx 

Houghton, Mich. 

Philomathcan. Y. W. C. A., Glee Club 



Walter R. Hints 

Menomonic. Wis. 

Rifle Club. Metallurgy, 

Lutheran Students 



William J. Soucie 
-B,ir 

Bonner. Sfont. 

Precideni Forum 

Student Advisory Board 




Rum E. Malcolm 
Chetck. v 



Henribtts I.. Q 
'■Dolly" 
Menomonic. W 
Editor Stoutonia, President Y. V. C. A. 
Hrperian, V. a. A. 
Donald B. Moldenhaver 



"Moi 

Fall Creek. Wu. 

Metallurgy. Lutheran Students, 

Orchestra. President Band 



Dave L. Feirer 
Menomonic. Wis. 



M 







Rliii C. Si 
Eranston, III. 



Ik \\» :> 

N. Y, 
"I Inky" 



FllANC I s A. S< IIKOI !>l K 

I iro Rivcrii Vis, 

Secretary M. A. I\ 



Mi 1 MOTH II. Bramstedt 

Fond du Lac, Vis. 

"Slim- 

Lutheran Students Glee Club 






A. MULLBB 










Frank 1. MaNN 






Charlttcon, S. C. 










Memmionie. Wit, 






"Cbtrlnioif 












Mjfi" 






Secretary and Treasurer Forum, 




> - 


retarv 


and 


Treasurer Orchestra 




Treasurer Senior Class. 
















[ni 


ra-Mural Sports Manager. M 
Lutheran Students 


A. P. 












I V. 1 imii MOM 
Clear like. « 






I \ v Iensen 










"lhiJ\" 




Downmllc 


NX... 








Glee Club 





















MI 













Axil ANDERSON 
Cleveland, Ohio 

"Do 

"S" Club 



Lbnici M. Oatbj 

Baraboo. v 



Verna C. Tiiompson 
Cameron. Wif. 




Mi i viN- Ri i n 
Hazelton, Pcnn. 



Anni t LA Anderson 
Rice Lake. 



Edwin M. Ri i n 
New Orleans, I i. 



XIII 



Our Tower Boosters 

MI XOMON'IE business men have done much to make our 1931 Tower a success 
both financially and otherwise. On this page we wish to express our apprecia- 
tion and thanks for the hearty co-operation and aid which they have rendered 
in making this book possible. The following is a list of the business houses of Menomo- 
nie who are Tower boosters. 



Ole Madsen. Jeweler. 
Volp's Grocery 
Menomonie Baking Co. 

Chevrolet Co. 
Esskay and Co. 
Menomonie Clinic. 
Golden Rule. 
Dr. Vanek, Dentist. 
Menomonie Dye House. 
Summert'ield's 
Fuller Auto Co. 
Carter Ice and Fuel Co. 
Vanity Beauty Parlor. 
Menomonie Auto Co. 
Crescent Creamery Co. 
Recreation Parlors. 
Chas. Pinkepank, Groceries. 
A. J. Joscphson. 
A. R. Olson. 
Keenan Hardware. 
The Smoke Shop. 
A. F. Herrem, Tailor. 
I n-.; National Bank. 
Manual Arts Press. Peoria. III. 
Kraft State Bank. 
Dr. Clark, Dentist. 
Drs. Steves, Halgrcn & Long. 
Montgomery >X'ard and Co. 
Badger State Lumber Co. 
Boothby Printshop. 



I Store. 
Rudi>;c: •"«. Radio Shop. 
Kern's Lakeside Cafe. 
Boston Drug Store. 
I [udson Essex Sales. 
Orpheum and Grand Theatres. 
Goodrich Furniture Store, 
-irancc. 
Dr. C. T. Kyle, Osteopath. 
Swsnson and 1> 
The Candy Shoppc. 

Vnshus, Jeweler. 
■ la Cortc. 

Shaker Studios. 
i [asse's Apparel Shop. 
John Meyer, Tailor. 

The Olympia Confectionery. 

Halbcrg Decoratir 

Hotel Marion. 

"Bye" Olson. 

Randle's Service Station. 

Milady's Shoppc. 

The W'ehrlc Shoppe. 

Guy's Studios, St. Cloud. Minn. 

Security Loan and Trust Co. 

Russel's Pastry Shoppe. 

Peerless Grill. 

Farmer's Store Co. 

Summervold's Cabinet Shop. 

O & N Lumber Co. 



Thank You 

AS this, the second publication of the 
Tower by the Junior Class is com- 
pleted, we, the Tower Staff, wish to 
express our appreciation to all who have 
made this publication possible. To the ad- 
visers and other instructors for their help- 
ful counsel, to the student body for gen- 
erous response to all requests, to the towns- 
people who so generously advertised in the 
school directory (a Tower project to help 
pay the expenses of the book), we express 
our sincere thanks. 

E. A. Wolter, Editor 



Engravers 

Buck bee Mean Co. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Printers 

McGill Warner Co. 

St. Paul, Minn.